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NICE says "yes" to over 80 per cent of treatments

Article: 8034679 pillsOver 80 per cent of the recommendations that NICE has made about new treatments since it started work in 1999 have been positive.

NICE is asked by the Department of Health to carry out these technology appraisals to decide whether or not a drug or treatment should be made available on the NHS.

From March 2000 to June 2010, NICE published 49 single technology appraisals, 141 multiple technology appraisals, and a total of 378 individual recommendations on the use of drugs and treatments.

All of the individual decisions from NICE´s technology appraisals are now available in one place online that offers an overview of all the recommendations and provides a table showing the classification of every appraisal recommendation.

Sir Andrew Dillon, Chief Executive of NICE, said: “We have taken the decision to publish, in one place, a summary of all of our technology appraisal decisions in order to make it easier to find out about the recommendations we make. These are now on the website with details for each recommendation.”

We also explain the four different recommendations that NICE can make when appraising a drug: recommended, optimised, only in research and not recommended.

These recommendations are based on the effectiveness of the treatment compared with competitor treatments already available on the NHS.

Overall, NICE has recommended 67 per cent of treatments for use in line with its licensed indication, and a further 16 per cent of treatments for “optimised use” under specific conditions, such as in a certain patient group.

A total of 6 per cent of treatments have been approved for “research only” which means that they are recommended for use only in the context of a research study, such as a clinical trial.

This can happen, particularly in the case of promising new technologies, because sufficient clinical evidence has not been collected at the time of the appraisal and so the Appraisal Committee is unable to recommend the technology for use in the NHS until further evidence on its effectiveness is available for re-appraisal.

In these cases NICE will recommend further research to investigate whether the promise of the technology can be realised.

Only 11 per cent of treatments were not recommended by NICE. In most instances, a drug is not recommended because there is a lack of evidence for its clinical effectiveness or if the treatment is not considered to be a cost-effective use of NHS resources, compared with current NHS practice.

21 July 2010

This page was last updated: 22 July 2010

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.