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NICE and social care

Social care guideline topics

Register as a stakeholder for social care guideline and quality standards

Social care quality standards pilot programme

NICE social care quality standards and the quality landscape

NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care

Social Care External Network

Citizens Council workshop on social care

Enquiries

Developing guidelines and quality standards for social care

NICE has a new responsibility, from April 2013, to develop guidelines and quality standards for social care in England. This provides an opportunity to apply an evidence-based system to decision-making in the social care sector, similar to that provided for the NHS. It will also allow us to produce guidelines that promotes better integration between health, public health and social care services. Our guidelines will be developed in close partnership with, rather than imposed upon, service users and carers, practitioners and organisations working in social care.

We know that the approach we take in social care needs to be different; people using the social care system and the workforce providing those services have different priorities and needs. So we have been careful to ensure that our methods and processes have been developed in close collaboration with the adults and children's care sectors.

This document explains the remit of NICE social care guidelines and this manual explains how we develop social care guidelines.

Social care guideline topics

In addition to the social care quality standards already published, NICE is currently developing or planning to develop guidelines and quality standards with a particular focus on social care on the topics below:

Topics for guideline and quality standard development

Published social care topics

Future social care topics

In February 2013 the Department of Health opened a consultation seeking views on topics for NICE to produce quality standards and guidelines on in the future to help improve the quality of social care and the interface with health services. The consultation closed on 3 May 2013. The Department of Health published a report detailing the outcome of the consultation held in Spring 2013 on future social care topics for NICE guidelines and quality standards. The Department of Health received over 270 responses to this consultation from a variety of sources. The outcome report is available on this webpage.

NICE held a workshop in December 2011 to review existing methodologies and processes for developing guidelines for social care and to discuss possible methodological adaptations and developments. A report outlining discussions from this workshop is available.

Register as a stakeholder for social care guidelines and quality standards

We encourage organisations to register as stakeholders for the development of NICE social care guidelines and quality standards. Registering as a stakeholder means that you will receive notification of topics under development, and be able to comment on draft guidelines and quality standards when they are put out for consultation.

You can also sign up to our monthly social care bulletin which provides updates on all social care work ongoing at NICE. Previous editions of the bulletin are available below:

To sign up, please email socialcaresh@nice.org.uk

Social care quality standards pilot programme

In 2011 the Department of Health asked NICE to run a pilot programme for developing social care quality standards focusing on two topics, dementia and looked after children. The pilot tested draft methods and processes, explored the format and presentation of the quality standards in social care settings, and helped us in developing our approach to integrating related health and social care standards.

More information on the pilot programme

NICE social care quality standards and the quality landscape

NICE social care guidelines and quality standards are not mandatory; they are intended for use in conjunction with the frameworks and regulation already in place, providing practical support to help drive up the quality of adult and children's care. This briefing, produced with the Department of Health and Department for Education, explains how NICE quality standards fit into the existing regulatory frameworks, such as the Care Quality Commission's Essential Standards and the Department for Education's National Minimum Standards.

NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care

We have set up the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care, which will use NICE's methods and processes to develop social care guidelines. NICE will then use these as a basis for its quality standards for social care. The NCCSC will also provide NICE with support for adoption and dissemination of social care guidelines and quality standards. In December we awarded a three year contract for the NCCSC to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and its partners:

Social Care External Network

The Social Care External Network was established in April 2012 to engage with key stakeholders and to gain advice from the sector on adoption and dissemination strategies for quality standards for social care. It was expanded and renamed as the NICE Social Care External Network in September 2013.

The purpose of the Network is to provide advice to NICE on the needs, and expectations of the social care sector and to advise how NICE can effectively present and disseminate its guidelines and quality standards ensuring effective use and adoption in practice. The Network also provides advice on integration of social care guidelines and quality standards into sector-led improvement and other quality initiatives.

Full Terms of Reference and membership of the Social Care External Network.

Citizen's Council

NICE's Citizens Council is a panel of 30 members of the public that provides a public perspective on the moral and ethical issues that NICE has to take into account when producing guidelines. In January 2013 it met to discuss the aspects of benefit, cost and need that NICE should consider when producing social care guidelines. The Council was asked to consider questions such as 'what does a good social care service look like?', and 'what are the values that should be reflected in social care services?'.

The Council concluded:

  • 'Benefit' should be seen in terms of the ability that someone has to be as independent as possible, and part of a community
  • Guidelines and standards should take carers into account and ensure they are supported in the vital job they do
  • The concept of 'need' in social care is different to need in healthcare where need is often determined by a health professional - in social care need is determined and defined by the service user, and is much broader
  • As need varies from person to person, more research should be carried out into how need is measured, to better inform what services to provide
  • The value of unpaid carers should be included in cost-effectiveness calculations
  • NICE's existing methods for assessing the costs of healthcare intervention are not sufficient for social care because there are more differences than similarities between the two areas. They felt that new methods and processes should be developed for this new area of work.

The Council's final report will inform the work of NICE's independent advisory committees. Before then, we would like to hear your views. The draft report is available for public comment until 19 April. The Council will then submit its report to the Board of NICE setting out its findings.

Enquiries

If you have any queries on the social care programme at NICE, please contact us.

This page was last updated: 07 April 2014

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Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.