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Determining local service levels for a bariatric surgical service for the treatment of people with severe obesity

Benchmarks for a standard population

Available data suggest that the benchmark rate at 5 years for a bariatric surgical service is 0.01% per year, or 10 per 100,000 population.

For a standard strategic health authority population of 4,870,000, the average number of people receiving bariatric surgery would be around 490 per year (0.01% of the population).

For a standard primary care trust population of 250,000, the average number of people receiving bariatric surgery would be 25 per year (0.01% of the population).

This equates to a more than threefold increase compared with the current estimated rate of bariatric surgery commissioned by the NHS. It does not reflect the optimum rate of procedures per year given the expected need in the population, and rates may need to increase beyond this. However, the topic-specific advisory group agreed that, given the relatively low levels of surgery currently commissioned, it is a rate that could be achieved in 5 years' time. They also noted that the service would require some investment and that commissioners would need to work closely with providers.

Commissioners will therefore need to develop local strategies to manage the number of people who meet the criteria in the NICE clinical guideline CG43 on obesity for bariatric surgery and therefore require access to that service.

This service is likely to fall under programme budgeting category 204X (endocrine, nutritional and metabolic problems).

Examine the assumptions used in estimating these figures.

Use the bariatric surgical service commissioning and benchmarking tool to determine the level of service that might be needed locally and to calculate the cost of commissioning the service using the indicative benchmark and/or your own local data.

Further information

Sources of further information to help you in assessing local health needs and reducing health inequalities include:

This page was last updated: 02 March 2012

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.