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The commissioning and benchmarking tool

Download the biologic drugs commissioning and benchmarking tool

Use the biologic drugs commissioning and benchmarking tool to determine the level of service that might be needed locally and to calculate the cost of commissioning the service, as described below.

Identify indicative local service requirements

The indicative benchmark based on the national average for the number of people with inflammatory disease in rheumatology, dermatology and gastroenterology is 0.19% or 190 per 100,000 population aged 18 years and older per year.

In addition, 0.015% or 15 per 100,000 children aged 4-17 years are eligible for and receiving biologic drugs for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, per year and 0.003% or 3 per 100,000 children aged 6-17 years are eligible for and receiving biologic drugs for the treatment of Crohn's disease, per year.

The commissioning and benchmarking tool helps you to assess local service requirements using the indicative benchmark rates as a starting point. With knowledge of your local population and its demographic, you can amend the benchmark to better reflect your local circumstances. For example, if your population is significantly younger or older than the average population or has a significantly higher or lower rate of inflammatory disease, you may need to provide biologic drugs for relatively fewer or greater numbers of people.

Review current commissioned activity

You may already commission biologic drugs for the treatment of inflammatory disease in rheumatology, dermatology and gastroenterology for your population. The tool provides tables that you can populate to help you calculate your current commissioned activity and costs.

You may wish to track patients who are currently receiving biologic drugs, to show the level of activity in secondary care. This may be compared to activity without the use of biologic drugs. The commissioning and benchmarking tool contains a data specification for the conditions mentioned in this guide and the OPCS-4 procedure codes associated with high cost drugs to enable you to do this.

Identify future change in capacity required

Using the indicative benchmark rates provided, or your own local benchmarks, you can use the commissioning and benchmarking tool to compare the activity that you may need to commission against your current commissioned activity. This will help you to identify the future change in capacity required. Depending on your assessment, your future provision may need to be increased or decreased.

Model future commissioning intentions and associated costs

You can use the commissioning and benchmarking tool to calculate the capacity and resources needed to move towards the benchmark level, and to model the required changes over a period of 4 years.

Use the tool to calculate the level and cost of activity you intend to commission and to consider the settings in which biologic drugs may be provided, comparing the costs of commissioning the service across the various settings. The tool is pre-populated with data on the potential recurrent cost elements that may need to be considered in future service planning, which can be reviewed and amended to better reflect your local circumstances.

The tool should be used to calculate the approximate cost of commissioning biologic drugs for your local population. Each of the biologic drugs approved by NICE for treatment of each condition, at the time of publication of this commissioning guide in October 2012 has been listed, with an estimated unit cost. The most appropriate or cost effective drug for each patient is not necessarily the drug with the lowest unit cost. Please refer to the original NICE guidance and associated costing tools for further details.

Commissioning decisions should consider both the clinical and economic viability of the service, and take into account the views of local people. Commissioning plans should also take into account the costs of monitoring the quality of the services commissioned.

This page was last updated: 16 October 2012

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Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.