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Determining local service levels for a paediatric continence service

Benchmarks for a standard population

Available data suggest that the indicative benchmark rate for a paediatric continence service is 0.8% or 800 per 100,000 population aged 19 years and under per year.

For the purpose of this commissioning guide the population has been defined as children and young people aged 19 years and under. Approximately 24%, or 12.3 million, of the population in England is aged 19 years and under.

For a standard population of 100,000 the number of children and young people aged 19 years and under is approximately 24%, or 24,000. Of these around 0.8%, or 200 children and young people per year, would require a paediatric continence service.

For an average practice with a list size of 10,000,the number of children and young people aged 19 years and under is approximately 24%, or 2400. Of these around 0.8%, or 20 children and young people per year, will require a paediatric continence service.

Examine the assumptions used in estimating these figures.

This service is likely to fall under the programme budgeting categories 213A ‘genito urinary system disorders' or 223X ‘other'.

Use the paediatric continence service commissioning and benchmarking tool to determine the level of service that might be needed locally and to calculate the cost of commissioning the service using the indicative benchmark and/or your own local data.

Further information

Sources of further information to help you in assessing local health needs and reducing health inequalities include:

  • Annex A of the Commissioning framework for health and well-being outlines the process and data needed to undertake a joint strategic needs assessment.
  • Department of Health Delivering quality and value - focus on benchmarking.
  • NICE Health equity audit - learning from practice briefing.
  • NHS comparators provides comparator data for NHS commissioning and provider organisations to enable users to investigate aspects of local activity, costs and outcomes.
  • The Disease management information toolkit (DMIT) is a good-practice tool for decision-makers, commissioners and deliverers of care for people with long-term conditions, which presents data on conditions that contribute to high numbers of emergency bed days. It models the effects of possible interventions that may be commissioned at a local level and helps users to consider the likely impact of commissioning options.
  • PRIMIS+ provides support to general practices on information management, recording for, and analysis of, data quality, plus a comparative analysis service focused on key clinical topics.
  • ChiMat (child and maternal health observatory) provides a data atlas on continence.

This page was last updated: 02 March 2012

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.