Navigation

Summary of Results

Health Topic:   Pathological conditions, symptoms and signs
Guidance:   Feverish illness in children
Description:   The summary of the published clinical guideline on Feverish illness in children. It links to the published guidance and key documents.

NICE implementation uptake reports

Implementation uptake report Assessment Published Date Coverage

External literature

External literature Assessment Coverage

Thompson M et al (2009) How well do vital signs identify children with serious infections in paediatric emergency care? Archives of Disease in Childhood 94(11):888-93

Description: Authors conducted a cohort study of children age 3 months-16 years attending the Paediatric Assessment Unit at the University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire. Authors concluded that the diagnostic value of combined vital signs and the NICE traffic light system remains to be determined in populations where the prevalence of severe illness is much lower.

Not graded Local

Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (2010) To understand and improve the experience of parents and carers who need advice when a child has a fever (high temperature)

Description: The authors approached parents using any urgent care service within Leicestershire, Peterborough and North West London for a febrile child less than 5 years in the period January to June 2009. None of the 314 cases documented said that they had used the NICE guideline 'traffic light' system in predicting risk. However, children were assessed for last least one of the features of the traffic light system.

Doubts about or mixed impact in practice Regional

Patel A et al (2010) Do traffic lights work in August: Variation in adherence to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence feverish illness in children guideline at the start of the new medical year Archives of Disease in Childhood 95 Suppl 4

Description: he authors conducted a structured case note review of junior doctors' management of children presenting with fever or reported fever in July and August 2009. 293 notes were reviewed in total. Results found that safety net advice documented in those discharged from the emergency department fell from 70.9% (56/79) in July to 55.9& (33/59) in August. Admissions of children with only green signs (12vs9) and discharge of those with red signs (1vs1) were similar between July and August.

Doubts about or mixed impact in practice Local

Blacklock, C. et al (2012) When and how do GPs record vital signs in children with acute infections? A cross-sectional study British Journal of General Practice, Volume 62, Number 603, October 2012 , pp. e679-e686(8)

Description: The aim of this research was to identify frequency of vital signs documentation by GPs, in the assessment of children with acute infections in primary care. The study includes data for 850 children seen by 106 different GPs from 15 surgeries in Oxfordshire and Somerset, gathered between June 2007 and July 2009. Of the children presenting with acute infections, at least one vital sign was recorded in 54.1% of children when free text proxies were considered along with numerical recording.

Doubts about or mixed impact in practice Local

The College of Emergency Medicine (2013) Feverish Children

Description: Results are presented from the audit of the treatment of feverish children (under 5 years of age) presenting to Emergency Departments (EDs) in England in 2012-13. 8653 cases from 180 EDs were included in the audit. Results suggest that in 42% of departments red flags are not being recognised and / or the NICE guideline has not been fully implemented. The percentage of EDs that have written discharge advice for parents/carers increased from 69% in 2010 to 74% in 2012.

Doubts about or mixed impact in practice National

This page was last updated: 01 February 2013

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.