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'Referral advice' recommendation details

Faecal incontinence

Guidance ID NICE 'referral advice' recommendation 'Referral advice' category
CG49 People who continue to have episodes of faecal incontinence after initial management should be considered for specialised management. This may involve referral to a specialist continence service. Time frame not specified
CG49 All people with faecal incontinence considering or being considered for surgery should be referred to a specialist surgeon to discuss the surgical and non-surgical options appropriate for their individual circumstances. Time frame not specified
CG49 If appropriate, people with faecal incontinence should be referred to the relevant professionals for assessment of their home and/or mobility Time frame not specified
CG49 Regarding patients with faecal incontinence and severe cognitive impairment, If baseline assessment and initial management have failed to resolve faecal incontinence, people with confirmed severe cognitive impairment should be referred for a behavioural and functional analysis to determine if there is any behavioural reason for faecal incontinence. In cases of severe cognitive impairment, further specialist management of faecal incontinence may be inappropriate. Time frame not specified
CG49 Healthcare professionals should consider in particular whether people with neurological or spinal disease/injury resulting in faecal incontinence, who have some residual motor function and are still symptomatic after baseline assessment and initial management, could benefit from specialised management. Time frame not specified
CG49 People with severe learning disabilities may have had faecal incontinence from childhood. Others may experience faecal incontinence for the first time in adulthood. It is essential that these individuals follow the same initial care pathway as other people with faecal incontinence. They may require additional support during assessment and management to achieve equal outcomes. Follow up

This page was last updated: 22 August 2012

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Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.