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'Referral advice' recommendation details

Referral for suspected cancer

Results 31-40 of 53

Guidance ID NICE 'referral advice' recommendation 'Referral advice' category
CG27 Children and young people who present with symptoms and signs of cancer should be referred to a paediatrician or a specialist children's cancer service, if appropriate. Urgent
CG27 The following general advice regarding appropriate support and provision of information should be considered referring patients with suspected cancer. When cancer is suspected in a child, the referral decision and information to be given to the child should be discussed with the parents or carers (and the patient if appropriate). Adult patients who are being referred with suspected cancer should normally be told by the primary healthcare professional that they are being referred to a cancer service, but if appropriate they should be reassured that most people referred will not have a diagnosis of cancer, and alternative diagnoses should be discussed. The information given to patients, family and/or carers as appropriate by the primary healthcare professional should cover, among other issues: - where patients are being referred to - how long they will have to wait for the appointment - how to obtain further information about the type of cancer - suspected or help prior to the specialist appointment - who they will be seen by - what to expect from the service the patient will be attending - what type of tests will be carried out, and what will happen during diagnostic procedures - how long it will take to get a diagnosis or test results - whether they can take someone with them to the appointment - other sources of support, including those for minority groups. When referring a patient with suspected cancer to a specialist service, primary healthcare professionals should assess the patient's need for continuing support while waiting for their referral appointment. This should include inviting the patient to contact the primary healthcare professional again if they have more concerns or questions before they see a specialist. All members of the primary healthcare team should have available, to them information in a variety of formats on both local and national sources of additional support for patients who are being referred with suspected cancer. In situations where diagnosis or referral has been delayed, or there is significant compromise of the doctor/patient relationship, the, primary healthcare professional should take care to assess the, information and support needs of the patient, parents and carers,and make sure these needs are met. The patient should be given the opportunity to consult another primary healthcare professional if they wish. Time frame not specified
CG27 Regarding suspected lower gastrintestinal cancer, in patients with equivocal symptoms who are not unduly anxious, it is reasonable to use a period of 'treat, watch and wait' as a method of management. Time frame not specified
CG27 In suspected lung cancer an urgent referral should be made for either of the following: persistent haemoptysis in smokers or ex-smokers who are aged 40 years and older or a chest X-ray suggestive of lung cancer (including pleural effusion and slowly resolving consolidation). Urgent
CG27 Unexplained changes in existing symptoms in patients with underlying chronic respiratory problems should prompt an urgent referral for chest X-ray. If the chest X-ray is normal, but there is a high suspicion of lung cancer, patients should be offered an urgent referral. Urgent
CG27 In individuals with a history of asbestos exposure and recent onset of chest pain, shortness of breath or unexplained systemic symptoms, lung cancer should be considered and a chest X-ray arranged. If this indicates a pleural effusion, pleural mass or any suspicious lung pathology, an urgent referral should be made. Urgent
CG27 In patients aged 55 years and older with unexplained and persistent recent-onset dyspepsia alone, an urgent referral for endoscopy should be made. Urgent
CG27 Vulval cancer may present with pruritus or pain. For a patient who presents with these symptoms, it is reasonable to use a period of 'treat, watch and wait' as a method of management. But this should include active follow-up until symptoms resolve or a diagnosis is confirmed. If symptoms persist, the referral may be urgent or non-urgent, depending on the symptoms and the degree of concern about cancer. Time frame not specified
CG27 Basal cell carcinomas are slow growing, usually without significant expansion over 2 months, and usually occur on the face. Where there is a suspicion that the patient has a basal cell carcinoma, a non-urgent referral should be made. Time frame not specified
CG27 In supected thyroid cancer, patients presenting with symptoms of tracheal compression including stridor due to thyroid swelling, should be referred immediately. In patients presenting with a thyroid swelling associated with any of the following, an urgent referral should be made: - a solitary nodule increasing in size - a history of neck irradiation - a family history of an endocrine tumour - unexplained hoarseness or voice changes - cervical lymphadenopathy - very young (pre-pubertal) patients - patients aged 65 years and older. urgent

This page was last updated: 22 August 2012

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.