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Type and Title of Submission


Title:

An audit of the implementation of NICE public health guidance on promoting physical activity for children and young people

Description:

This example describes an audit of the implementation of NICE public health guidance on promoting physical activity for children and young people in Oxfordshire in the academic year 2011/12.

Does the submission relate to the general implementation of all NICE guidance?

No

Does the submission relate to the implementation of a specific piece of NICE guidance?

Yes

Full title of NICE guidance:

PH17 - Promoting physical activity for children and young people

Is the submission industry-sponsored in any way?

No


Description of submission


Aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of this project were to determine:
- the extent to which the NICE public health guidance 17 on promoting physical activity for children and young people has been implemented by schools across Oxfordshire
- whether variations in implementation of the NICE guidance exist between affluent and deprived areas and rural and urban areas within Oxfordshire
- barriers that schools face in implementing the NICE guidance
- physical activity levels of pupils in schools in Oxfordshire

Context

Evidence shows that children who are physically active have a better chance of becoming healthy adults, yet a significant proportion of children are not reaching recommended levels of activity. Regular activity not only reduces the risk of obesity in adulthood, but it also reduces the likelihood of risk factors for chronic diseases, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, developing early in life and has been shown to lead to higher academic attainment.

Children and young people in Oxfordshire are considered to have significantly lower rates of physical activity than the England average. This is based on the PE and Sport Survey in 2009/10 which found that only just over a quarter (26.7%) of year 1-13 pupils spend at least 3 hours per week on high quality physical education and school sport in Oxford compared to the national average of 55%. However as Oxfordshire has significantly better rates of obesity in children and adults compared to the national average and significantly better rates of physical activity in adults it is possible that children and young people are being more active outside of the school curriculum in after school clubs, break times, travel to school and outside of school in the community.

In January 2009, NICE published public health guidance on promoting physical activity for children and young people which, in line with the Department of Health's physical activity guidelines published in July 2011, recommends that children and young people should do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity every day.

The guidance contains many recommendations aimed at schools and these cover active travel, promoting physical activity in the curriculum, consultation and involvement of children and young people, involving families and provision physical activity space/facilities/equipment.

An audit of the implementation of the NICE guidance on promoting physical activity for children and young people across schools in Oxfordshire will determine whether we are providing the recommended promotion interventions in schools to help ensure children and young people are active for at least 60 minutes over the course of the day. It will also help to determine any gaps and variations in practice and provision of promoting physical activity for children and young people in schools Oxfordshire.

Methods

Physical activity audit questionnaires were sent by email on the 27th of June 2012 to head teachers of all primary and secondary schools across Oxfordshire, excluding schools in Oxford. Head teachers were given the option of completing the questionnaire via email or survey monkey. They were given three weeks to return the questionnaires. Schools in Oxford were contacted by the Schools Sports Development Manager at Oxford City Council to arrange face-to-face interviews to complete the questionnaire.

In addition to the recommendations in NICE public health guidance 17 on promoting physical activity in children and young people, the questionnaire included questions around barriers to implementing NICE guidance, levels of physical activity, out of hours school sport clubs (OSHL) and competitive sports. See Appendix 1 in the supporting material for primary school questionnaire and Appendix 2 for secondary school questionnaire.

Results were analysed in Excel. Where possible results were analysed by school type (primary and secondary schools) and district (Oxford City, Cherwell, South Oxfordshire, West Oxfordshire and Vale of White Horse). Results were not analysed separately for special schools due to the small numbers responding or by academy schools as the majority of secondary schools who responded were academies. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated where appropriate to determine whether outcomes were associated with deprivation and rural status.

Results and evaluation

Only half of the recommendations aimed at schools in the NICE public health guidance 17 on promoting physical activity in children and young people were met by primary and secondary schools in Oxfordshire. This ranged across Oxfordshire from an average of 43% of recommendations being met in Oxford City schools to 57% in the Vale. No strong associations were found between number of NICE recommendations met and deprivation and rurality.

See Appendix 4 in the supporting material for the percentage of schools meeting each NICE recommendation.

Only half of schools felt that the guidance is a useful summary of evidence based interventions and approaches to promoting physical activity. 42% of respondents felt that the guidance offers novel approaches to promoting physical activity in schools and 25% of respondents felt that the guidance will change promoting physical activity practice in their school.

The main barrier faced by schools in implementing NICE guidance on promoting physical activity in children and young people was unawareness of the guidance with 70% of schools responding to the questionnaire stating that this was a barrier. The second biggest barrier was time constraints with 61% of schools stating that this was a barrier, followed by monetary constraints (57%), schools having no statutory responsibility to carry out NICE guidance (43%) and complicated and lengthy guidance (41%).

For further detailed results, please see the supporting material.

Key learning points

Public Health Departments
1. Increase awareness of NICE guidance on promoting physical activity in children and young people across schools.
2. Develop with partners a coordinated strategy to improve physical activity in children and young people which encompasses the recommendations in the NICE guidance. Partners should work with the Partnership Development Managers and School Games Officers to develop and implement the strategy.
3. Work with sports partnerships to develop links between schools and sports clubs and to make school facilities available outside of schools hours.
4. Encourage schools to develop a school travel plan, to integrate the plan with travel plans of other schools and to involve children and young people, parents, the local community and external agencies in implementing the plan.

View the supporting material

Contact Details

Name:Lisa Peto
Job Title:Public Health Speciality Registrar
Organisation:NHS Oxfordshire
Address:Jubilee House, 5510 John Smith Drive, Oxford Business Park
Town:South Cowley, Oxford
County:Oxon
Postcode:OX4 2LH
Phone:07767 893217
Email:lisa.peto@nhs.net

 

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This page was last updated: 29 October 2012

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.