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Dementia: supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care [CG42]

Measuring the use of this guidance

Recommendation: 1.1.1.4

Health and social care staff should identify the specific needs of people with dementia and their carers arising from ill health, physical disability, sensory impairment, communication difficulties, problems with nutrition, poor oral health and learning disabilities. Care plans should record and address these needs

What was measured: Case notes that had a section dedicated to gathering information from the carer within the care assessment notes
Data collection end: November 2016
57%
Number that met the criteria: 5727 / 10010
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: Hospitals that had a formal system in place for gathering information pertinent to caring for a patient with dementia
Data collection end: November 2016
99%
Number that met the criteria: 196 / 199
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.1.1.5

Health and social care staff, especially in residential settings, should identify and, wherever possible, accommodate the preferences of people with dementia and their carers, including diet, sexuality and religion. Care plans should record and address these preferences.

What was measured: The proportion of case notes that detail information collected about food and drink preferences of the person with dementia.
Data collection end: November 2016
44%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.1.4.2

Health and social care professionals should inform people with dementia and their carers about advocacy services and voluntary support, and should encourage their use. If required, such services should be available for both people with dementia and their carers independently of each other.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals with access to an advocacy service for people with dementia.
Data collection end: November 2016
95%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.1.7.3

Care managers and care coordinators should ensure the coordinated delivery of health and social care services for people with dementia. This should involve: • a combined care plan agreed by health and social services that takes into account the changing needs of the person with dementia and his or her carers • assignment of named health and/or social care staff to operate the care plan • endorsement of the care plan by the person with dementia and/or carers • formal reviews of the care plan, at a frequency agreed between professionals involved and the person with dementia and/or carers and recorded in the notes.

What was measured: Hospitals have a system to ensure carers are advised about obtaining a carers assessment
Data collection end: November 2016
67%
Number that met the criteria: 2605 / 3868
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.1.9.1

Health and social care managers should ensure that all staff working with older people in the health, social care and voluntary sectors have access to dementia-care training (skill development) that is consistent with their roles and responsibilities

What was measured: Proportion of acute trusts that have specific dementia training for all staff caring for older people.
Data collection end: October 2015
89%
Area covered: England
Source: NHS Benchmarking Network. Older People’s Care in Acute Settings Benchmarking Report.

What was measured: Hospitals that had a training and knowledge framework that identifies necessary skill development in working with and caring for people with dementia
Data collection end: November 2016
96%
Number that met the criteria: 190 / 199
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals providing dementia awareness training to nurses.
Data collection end: November 2016
100%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals providing dementia awareness training to healthcare assistants.
Data collection end: November 2016
100%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals providing dementia awareness training to allied healthcare professionals
Data collection end: November 2016
98%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals providing dementia awareness training to doctors.
Data collection end: November 2016
93%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.

What was measured: The proportion of hospitals providing dementia awareness training to support staff.
Data collection end: November 2016
91%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.1.11.2

Acute trusts should ensure that all people with suspected or known dementia using inpatient services are assessed by a liaison service that specialises in the treatment of dementia. Care for such people in acute trusts should be planned jointly by the trust's hospital staff, liaison teams, relevant social care professionals and the person with suspected or known dementia and his or her carers.

What was measured: Proportion of carers on admission, that were included in discussions about their loved one’s care and treatment
Data collection end: June 2017
50%
Area covered: England
Source: Dementia care in hospitals: from the perspective of carers (2018). National Federation of Women’s Institutes

What was measured: Proportion of carers that believed that staff did not listen to and, where appropriate, act on the information they provided about their loved one.
Data collection end: June 2017
37%
Area covered: England
Source: Dementia care in hospitals: from the perspective of carers (2018). National Federation of Women’s Institutes


Recommendation: 1.4.2.1

A basic dementia screen should be performed at the time of presentation, usually within primary care. It should include: routine haematology biochemistry tests (including electrolytes, calcium, glucose, and renal and liver function) thyroid function tests serum vitamin B12 and folate levels.

What was measured: Proportion of patients with a new diagnosis of dementia recorded in the preceding 1 April to 31 March with a record of FBC, calcium, glucose, renal and liver function, thyroid function tests, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels recorded between 6 months before or after entering on to the register.
Data collection end: March 2015
74.7%
Area covered: England
Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre. Quality Outcomes Framework.

What was measured: DEM005: The percentage of patients with a new diagnosis of dementia recorded in the preceding 1 April to 31 March with a record of FBC, calcium, glucose, renal and liver function, thyroid function tests, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels recorded between 6 months before or after entering on to the register.
Data collection end: March 2016
56.5%
Data collection end: March 2017
67.7%
Area covered: National
Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre. Quality and Outcomes Framework.


Recommendation: 1.7.1.1

"People with dementia who develop non‑cognitive symptoms that cause them significant distress or who develop behaviour that challenges should be offered an assessment at an early opportunity to establish likely factors that may generate, aggravate or improve such behaviour. The assessment should be comprehensive and include: the person's physical health depression possible undetected pain or discomfort side effects of medication individual biography, including religious beliefs and spiritual and cultural identity psychosocial factors physical environmental factors behavioural and functional analysis conducted by professionals with specific skills, in conjunction with carers and care workers. Individually tailored care plans that help carers and staff address the behaviour that challenges should be developed, recorded in the notes and reviewed regularly. The frequency of the review should be agreed by the carers and staff involved and written in the notes."

What was measured: The proportion of case notes that detailed information collected about factors that can calm the person with dementia if agitated.
Data collection end: November 2016
28%
Number that met the criteria: 1564 / 5539
Data collection end: November 2016
25%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.


Recommendation: 1.10.1.4

Health and social care staff should encourage people with dementia to eat and drink by mouth for as long as possible. Specialist assessment and advice concerning swallowing and feeding in dementia should be available. Dietary advice may also be beneficial. Nutritional support, including artificial (tube) feeding, should be considered if dysphagia is thought to be a transient phenomenon, but artificial feeding should not generally be used in people with severe dementia for whom dysphagia or disinclination to eat is a manifestation of disease severity. Ethical and legal principles should be applied when making decisions about withholding or withdrawing nutritional support.

What was measured: Proportion of case notes analysed that had evidence of nutritional assessment being performed
Data collection end: November 2016
90%
Area covered: National
Source: Royal College of Psychiatrists. National Audit of Dementia.



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