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Atopic eczema in children: management of atopic eczema in children from birth up to the age of 12 years [CG57]

Measuring the use of this guidance

Recommendation: 1.5.1.2

Healthcare professionals should offer children with atopic eczema and their parents or carers information on how to recognise flares of atopic eczema (increased dryness, itching, redness, swelling and general irritability). They should give clear instructions on how to manage flares according to the stepped-care plan, and prescribe treatments that allow children and their parents or carers to follow this plan

What was measured: Parents / carers / children who were given information on how to recognise flare ups
Data collection end: December 2009
68%
Number that met the criteria: 34 / 50
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53

What was measured: Proportion of children and young people with a diagnosis of atopic eczema who were provided information about how to recognise flare ups.
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53


Recommendation: 1.5.7.1

Children with atopic eczema and their parents or carers should be offered information on how to recognise the symptoms and signs of bacterial infection with staphylococcus and/or streptococcus (weeping, pustules, crusts, atopic eczema failing to respond to therapy, rapidly worsening atopic eczema, fever and malaise). Healthcare professionals should provide clear information on how to access appropriate treatment when a child's atopic eczema becomes infected.

What was measured: Parents / carers / children given advice on how to recognise infected eczema
Data collection end: December 2009
24%
Number that met the criteria: 12 / 50
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53


Recommendation: 1.5.7.12

Children with atopic eczema and their parents or carers should be offered information on how to recognise eczema herpeticum. Signs of eczema herpeticum are: • areas of rapidly worsening, painful eczema • clustered blisters consistent with early-stage cold sores • punched-out erosions (circular, depressed, ulcerated lesions) usually 1–3 mm that are uniform in appearance (these may coalesce to form larger areas of erosion with crusting) • possible fever, lethargy or distress.

What was measured: Parents / carers / children given advice on how to recognise eczema herpeticum
Data collection end: December 2009
4%
Number that met the criteria: 2 / 50
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53

What was measured: Proportion of children and young people with a diagnosis of atopic eczema who were provided information about eczema herpeticum.
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53


Recommendation: 1.6.1.1

Healthcare professionals should spend time educating children with atopic eczema and their parents or carers about atopic eczema and its treatment. They should provide information in verbal and written forms, with practical demonstrations, and should cover: • how much of the treatments to use • how often to apply treatments • when and how to step treatment up or down • how to treat infected atopic eczema. This should be reinforced at every consultation, addressing factors that affect adherence.

What was measured: Proportion of children and young people with a diagnosis of atopic eczema who were provided information about infected eczema.
Data collection end: December 2012
96%
Number that met the criteria: 48 / 50
Area covered: Local
Source: Scharrer K et al (2013)Pro forma improves compliance with NICE guidance in the assessment and management of atopic eczema in children under 12 years. British Journal of Dermatology Vol 169 Suppl 1 p 52-53



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