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Preventing excess weight gain [NG7]

Measuring the use of this guidance

Recommendation: 2

Encourage people to be more physically active and to reduce sedentary behaviour. Encourage people to build activity into daily life, developing routines and habits that gradually increase the amount and intensity of activity they do. This may include: Increasing regular walking, particularly brisk walking, or cycling as a form of active travel (to school, work or other local destinations). (See NICE's guideline on walking and cycling.) Increasing activities during leisure time and breaks at work or school (including some periods of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity). This could include any form of physical activity, sport or exercise such as walking, cycling, swimming, dancing or gardening. Increasing activity as part of daily routines (such as taking regular breaks from sitting at home or work, and taking the stairs instead of the lift). Reducing TV viewing and other screen time. Advise people that any strategy that reduces TV viewing and other leisure screen time may be helpful (such as TV‑free days or setting a limit to watch TV for no more than 2 hours a day).

What was measured: Public Health Outcomes Framework indicator 2.13: Proportion of over 16s doing at least 150 “equivalent” minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more in the previous 28 days.
Data collection end: December 2014
57%
Data collection end: December 2015
57%
Area covered: England
Source: Sport England - Active people survey

What was measured: Proportion of over 16s doing at least 150 “equivalent” minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity (excluding gardening) per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more.
Data collection end: November 2016
62.1%
Data collection end: November 2017
61.8%
Data collection end: May 2018
62.3%
Area covered: England
Source: Sport England. Active Lives Survey

What was measured: The proportion of children and young people aged 5 to 16 meeting the Chief Medical Officer guidelines of taking part in sport and physical activity for at least 60 minutes every day.
Data collection end: July 2018
17.5%
Area covered: England
Source: Sport England. Children and Young People Active Lives Survey.


Recommendation: 3

Encourage dietary habits that reduce the risk of excess energy intake Encourage everyone to follow a dietary pattern that is mainly based on vegetables, fruits, beans and pulses, wholegrains and fish. In addition, everyone should be encouraged to: Reduce the overall energy density of the diet. Practical ways to achieve this may include: reducing how often energy dense foods and drinks (such as fried foods, biscuits, savoury snacks, confectionery and drinks made with full fat milk or cream) are eaten substituting energy dense items with foods and drinks with a lower energy density (such as fruit and vegetables or water) using food and drink labels to choose options lower in fat and sugar choosing smaller portions or avoiding additional servings of energy dense foods. Limit consumption of energy dense food and drinks prepared outside the home, particularly 'fast' or 'takeaway' foods. Avoid sugary drinks (including carbonated drinks, sports drinks, squashes and any other drinks that contain free sugars). Everyone should be encouraged to choose water or other drinks that do not contain free sugars. Other suitable drinks may include coffee, tea or drinks containing non-nutritive sweeteners, such as 'diet' versions of carbonated drinks or squashes. Reduce total fat intake. Practical ways of doing this may include choosing lower fat options of the main sources of fat in the diet, reducing portion size or frequency of consumption of foods high in fat (such as meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, fats and oils, and baked foods such as pizza, biscuits and cakes). Eat breakfast but do not increase overall daily energy intake. Breakfast choices should reflect existing healthy eating advice (see recommendation 1). Practical ways to achieve this may include opting for unsweetened wholegrain cereals or bread, lower fat milk and a portion of fruit. Increase the proportion of high fibre or wholegrain foods eaten. Practical ways to do this may include: choosing wholemeal bread and pasta and wholegrain rice instead of 'white' versions opting for higher-fibre foods (such as oats, fruit and vegetables, beans, peas and lentils) in place of food and drinks high in fat or sugar. Limit intake of meat and meat products. Follow existing advice from NHS Choices to eat no more than 70 g of red and processed meat a day on average. Practical ways to do this may include reducing the portion size of meat or how often meals including meat are eaten.

What was measured: Public Health Outcomes Framework indicator 2.11: Proportion of the population who, when surveyed, reported that they had eaten the recommended 5 portions of fruit and vegetables on the previous day.
Data collection end: October 2014
53.5%
Data collection end: October 2015
52.3%
Area covered: England
Source: Sport England - Active people survey

What was measured: Public Health Outcomes Framework indicator 2.11: Proportion of the adult population who, when surveyed, reported that they eat the recommended 5 portions of fruit and vegetables on a 'usual day'.
Data collection end: March 2016
56.8%
Data collection end: March 2017
57.4%
Area covered: England
Source: Public Health England. Public Health Outcomes Framework



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