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Mental wellbeing at work [PH22]

Measuring the use of this guidance

Recommendation: 3

"Who should benefit? Employees. Who should take action? Refer to recommendation 1. What action should they take? - If reasonably practical, provide employees with opportunities for flexible working according to their needs and aspirations in both their personal and working lives. Different options for flexible working include part-time working, home-working, job sharing and flexitime. Such opportunities can enhance employees' sense of control and promote engagement and job satisfaction. - Promote a culture within the organisation that supports flexible working and addresses employees' concerns. Managers should respond to and seek to accommodate appropriate requests from employees for flexible working and should ensure consistency and fairness in processing applications. Managers' ability to manage teams with flexible working patterns may need to be developed. - Consider particular models of flexible working that recognise the distinct characteristics of micro, small and medium-sized businesses and organisations."

What was measured: Proportion of NHS staff who report being satisfied or very satisfied with the opportunities for flexible working patterns.
Data collection end: December 2016
52%
Data collection end: December 2017
51%
Area covered: England
Source: Picker Institute. NHS staff survey.


Recommendation: Recommendation 4

The role of line managers. Strengthen the role of line managers in promoting the mental wellbeing of employees through supportive leadership style and management practices. This will involve: • promoting a management style that encourages participation, delegation, constructive feedback, mentoring and coaching • ensuring that policies for the recruitment, selection, training and development of managers recognise and promote these skills • ensuring that managers are able to motivate employees and provide them with the training and support they need to develop their performance and job satisfaction • increasing understanding of how management style and practices can help to promote the mental wellbeing of employees and keep their stress to a minimum • ensuring that managers are able to identify and respond with sensitivity to employees' emotional concerns, and symptoms of mental health problems • ensuring that managers understand when it is necessary to refer an employee to occupational health services or other sources of help and support • considering the competency framework developed by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, the Health and Safety Executive and Investors in People as a tool for management development

What was measured: Proportion of NHS staff who report being satisfied or very satisfied with the support they get from their immediate manager.
Data collection end: December 2016
68%
Data collection end: December 2017
69%
Area covered: England
Source: Picker Institute. NHS staff survey.

What was measured: Proportion of NHS staff who report agreeing or strongly agreeing that their immediate manager asks for their opinion before making decisions that affect their work.
Data collection end: December 2017
56%
Area covered: England
Source: Picker Institute Europe NHS Staff Survey

What was measured: Proportion of NHS staff who report agreeing or strongly agreeing that their immediate manager asks for their opinion before making decisions that affect their work.
Data collection end: December 2016
55%
Area covered: England
Source: Picker Institute. NHS staff survey.

What was measured: Proportion of NHS staff who report agreeing or strongly agreeing that their immediate manager takes a positive interest in their health and well-being.
Data collection end: December 2016
67%
Data collection end: December 2017
68%
Area covered: England
Source: Picker Institute. NHS staff survey.



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