Quality statement 4: Patient information

Quality statement

People who may need or who have had a blood transfusion are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Rationale

It is important that people fully understand the benefits and risks of a blood transfusion, so they can give informed consent. Discussing the alternatives, and knowing that they cannot donate blood after a blood transfusion, helps people to decide if they want one. However, some blood transfusions are not planned and are carried out in an emergency. In these cases information should be given after the transfusion, including advice about the implications of the transfusion. Helping people to understand the process and its implications can improve their experience of receiving a blood transfusion.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that people who may need or who have had a blood transfusion are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Data source: Local data collection.

Process

a) Proportion of people who may need a blood transfusion who are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Numerator – the number in the denominator who are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Denominator – the number of people who may need a blood transfusion.

Data source: Local data collection.

b) Proportion of people who have had a blood transfusion who are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Numerator – the number in the denominator who are given verbal and written information about blood transfusion.

Denominator – the number of people who have had a blood transfusion.

Data source: Local data collection.

Outcome

Patient satisfaction with information they are given about blood transfusion.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (secondary care services) ensure that systems are in place to give verbal and written information about blood transfusion to people who may need or who have had a blood transfusion.

Healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses and blood transfusion specialists) give verbal and written information about blood transfusion to people who may need or who have had a blood transfusion.

Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups) commission services that give verbal and written information about blood transfusion to people who may need or who have had a blood transfusion.

People who may need a blood transfusion, or who have had one unexpectedly (for example, because of serious bleeding during an operation), have information about blood transfusion explained to them verbally and in writing.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

People who may need a blood transfusion

People who have had a blood sample taken and sent to the blood transfusion laboratory for grouping and/or antibody screening.

[Expert consensus]

Verbal and written information

This should cover:

  • the reason for the transfusion

  • the risks and benefits

  • the transfusion process

  • any transfusion needs specific to them

  • any alternatives that are available, and how they might reduce their need for a transfusion

  • that they are no longer eligible to donate blood.

[NICE's guideline on blood transfusion]