Update information

Update information

February 2015: We have removed reference to throat swabs from recommendation 1.3.14, to bring the recommendation into line with Public Health England's guidance on meningococcal disease.

September 2010: The hydrocortisone dosage in recommendation 1.4.45 relating to steroid replacement therapy using low-dose corticosteroids in children and young people with shock that is unresponsive to vasoactive agents has been amended. The original recommendation stated:

"In children and young people with shock that is unresponsive to vasoactive agents, steroid replacement therapy using low-dose corticosteroids (hydrocortisone 0.25 mg/m2 four times daily) should be used only when directed by a paediatric intensivist."

The corrected recommendation reads:

"In children and young people with shock that is unresponsive to vasoactive agents, steroid replacement therapy using low-dose corticosteroids (hydrocortisone 25 mg/m2 four times daily) should be used only when directed by a paediatric intensivist."

Minor changes since publication

October 2022: We added text to indicate that pulse oximetry may be less reliable in people with dark skin. We also added a link to the NHS patient safety alerton the risk of harm from inappropriate placement of pulse oximeter probes. See recommendation 1.4.37.

In recommendation 1.4.30 we updated the volume of fluid boluses used for intravenous fluid therapy from 20 ml/kg to 10 ml/kg for children and young people with suspected or confirmed meningococcal septicaemia and signs of shock. See the surveillance report for more information.

April 2021: We added a cross-reference to recommendations on antibiotic treatment for suspected and confirmed meningitis in babies of up to and including 28 days corrected gestational age who are in neonatal units, in the NICE guideline on neonatal infection.

October 2018: After a surveillance review, links to other NICE guidelines and external websites have been updated or replaced if needed.

ISBN: 978-1-4731-3040-1

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)