How we made the decision

Exceptionally, significant new evidence may mean an update of a guideline is agreed before the next scheduled check of the need for updating. The evidence might be a single piece of evidence, an accumulation of evidence or other published NICE guidance.

For details of the process and update decisions that are available, see ensuring that published guidelines are current and accurate in developing NICE guidelines: the manual.

New evidence

We found 36 studies in a focused search for studies addressing immunohistochemistry testing and gene expression profiling with no restrictions on the type of study.

See appendix A: summary of evidence from surveillance for details of all evidence considered, and references.

Views of topic experts

We were notified that clinical practice in immunohistochemistry markers and molecular profiling may have changed since the guideline was developed. The guideline lead clinician and another topic expert were contacted for their opinion on this question.

Views of stakeholders

Stakeholders are consulted only if we decide not to update the guideline following checks at 4 and 8 years after publication. Because this was an exceptional surveillance review, and the decision was not to update, we did not consult on the decision.

See ensuring that published guidelines are current and accurate in developing NICE guidelines: the manual for more details on our consultation processes.

NICE Surveillance programme project team

Kay Nolan
Associate Director

Philip Alderson
Consultant Clinical Adviser

Katrina Sparrow and Judith Thornton
Technical Advisers

Lynne Kincaid
Technical Analyst

The NICE project team would like to thank the topic experts who participated in the surveillance process.

ISBN: 978-1-4731-2412-7


This page was last updated: 06 April 2017