Detecting acute kidney injury and finding the cause

Detecting acute kidney injury and finding the cause

If you are at risk of acute kidney injury, your healthcare professional should regularly check your blood to look for a rise in creatinine (a marker of how well your kidneys are working). They should also check how much urine you are passing because passing low amounts can be a sign of kidney injury. Your urine will also be tested with a 'dipstick'. Dipstick testing will allow healthcare professionals to quickly check for some signs of acute kidney injury. Depending on the results of these tests, they may decide to refer you to a team specialising in kidney problems (the nephrology team).

Ultrasound scans

If healthcare professionals detect acute kidney injury, they may send you for an ultrasound scan to find out more about your condition. An ultrasound scan uses sound waves to make a picture or image of your kidneys. If healthcare professionals suspect a severe infection of the kidney with blocked drainage to the bladder, you should have the scan within 6 hours. You should have the scan within 24 hours if healthcare professionals are not sure of the cause of the kidney injury or you're at risk of your waterworks (urinary tract) becoming blocked.

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