1 Recommendations

1 Recommendations

1.1 Current evidence on the short-term safety and efficacy of bioresorbable stent implantation for treating coronary artery disease is adequate, but the quantity of evidence on the safety and efficacy of the procedure in the long term is inadequate. Therefore this procedure should only be used with special arrangements for clinical governance, consent and audit or research.

1.2 Clinicians wishing to undertake bioresorbable stent implantation for treating coronary artery disease should take the following actions.

  • Inform the clinical governance leads in their NHS trusts.

  • Ensure that patients understand the uncertainty about the procedure's safety and efficacy in the longer term and provide them with clear written information. In addition, the use of NICE's information for the public is recommended.

  • Enter details about all patients undergoing bioresorbable stent implantation for treating coronary artery disease onto the UK Central Cardiac Audit Database and review clinical outcomes locally.

1.3 NICE encourages further research into bioresorbable stent implantation for treating coronary artery disease and may review the procedure on publication of further evidence. Details of subsequent antiplatelet therapy should be reported and outcomes should include major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and target vessel revascularisation (defined as any repeat percutaneous intervention or surgical bypass of any segment of the treated vessel), particularly in the long term (at least 2–3 years). Studies on the safety and efficacy of the procedure compared with other types of coronary stent implantation would be useful.

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)