Introduction

Introduction

This is one of three pieces of NICE guidance published in November 2010 on how to prevent unintentional injuries among under-15s. A second publication covers strategies, regulation, enforcement, surveillance and workforce development and a third covers unintentional injuries on the road.

The Department of Health (DH) asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to produce public health guidance on preventing unintentional injuries in the home among children and young people aged under 15. This guidance focuses on home-safety assessments and the supply and installation of home safety equipment. It aims to prevent unintentional injuries among all children and young people but in particular, those living in disadvantaged circumstances, as they are at increased risk compared to the general population.

The guidance is for commissioners and providers of health services, environmental health services, housing services and associations, local authority children's services, local authority health and wellbeing boards, local authorities and their strategic partnerships, local safeguarding children boards, police, fire and rescue services, Sure Start and children's centres.

It is also for practitioners who visit families and carers with children and young people aged under 15 (including GPs, midwives, social workers and health visitors).

The guidance may also be of interest to children, young people, their parents and carers and other members of the public.

This is one of three pieces of NICE guidance being developed on how to prevent unintentional injuries among children and young people aged under 15. In particular, it is closely linked to guidance focused on strategies, regulation, enforcement, surveillance and workforce development. (This covers unintentional injuries in the home, on the road and in outdoor settings and was published in November 2010.) The other publication addresses road design and modification. For further details, see section 7.

The Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee (PHIAC) developed these recommendations on the basis of two reviews of the evidence, cost effectiveness modelling, expert advice, stakeholder comments and fieldwork.

Members of PHIAC are listed in appendix A. The methods used to develop the guidance are summarised in appendix B. Supporting documents used to prepare this document are listed in appendix E.

Full details of the evidence collated, including fieldwork data and stakeholder comments, are available on the NICE website, along with a list of the stakeholders involved and NICE's supporting process and methods manuals.

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)