10 Gaps in the evidence

10 Gaps in the evidence

The Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee (PHIAC) identified a number of gaps in the evidence related to the programmes under examination based on an assessment of the evidence. These gaps are set out below.

1. Very few studies (those available were mainly from the US and Canada) directly compared the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of type 2 diabetes in people of different ethnic groups.

(Source: evidence review)

2. No large published prospective studies were identified that compared white populations, in terms of health or mortality outcomes associated with BMI, to black, Asian or other minority ethnic groups resident in the UK.

(Source: evidence review)

3. In addition, no suitable studies were identified for Middle Eastern populations.

(Source: evidence review)

4. There was a lack of studies that directly compared the association between BMI and the differential health risks for people of different ethnic groups apart from for diabetes. Other possible health outcomes of interest may include cancer, stroke and myocardial infarction.

(Source: evidence review)

5. There was a lack of studies on health outcomes using waist circumference as the explanatory variable. Possible related health outcomes include cancer, diabetes, stroke and myocardial infarction.

(Source: evidence review)

6. No national or international studies were identified that examined the differential health risk of people of mixed family origin, compared with other ethnic groups, using BMI or waist circumference as the explanatory variable. Possible health outcomes of interest may include diabetes, stroke, cancer and myocardial infarction.

(Source: evidence review)

7. There was a lack of studies on the ethnically diverse health risk associations between BMI or waist circumference in relation to cancer. In particular, there was a lack of studies of the links between obesity and breast or bowel cancer.

(Source: evidence review)

The Committee made 8 recommendations for research into areas that it believes will be a priority for developing future guidance. These are listed in Recommendations for research.

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)