12 About this guidance

Why has guidance been produced?

NICE public health guidance makes recommendations on the promotion of good health and the prevention of ill health.

The Department of Health (DH) asked the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to produce this guidance.

The guidance should be implemented alongside other guidance and regulations (for more details see Implementation, below, and Related NICE guidance respectively).

How was this guidance developed?

The recommendations are based on the best available evidence. They were developed by the Programme Development Group (PDG).

Members of the PDG are listed in Membership of the Programme Development Group and the NICE project team.

For information on how NICE public health guidance is developed, see the NICE public health guidance process and methods guides.

What evidence is the guidance based on?

The evidence that the PDG considered included:

  • Evidence reviews:

    • Review 1: 'Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of lifestyle weight management services for children and young people', was carried out by Support Unit for Research Evidence (SURE), Cardiff University. The principal authors were: Fiona Morgan, Alison Weightman, (SURE, Cardiff University) Sarah Whitehead (DECIPHer, Cardiff University) and Sinead Brophy (DECIPHer, Swansea University).

    • Review 2: 'The barriers and facilitators to implementing lifestyle weight management programmes for children and young people', was carried out by SURE, Cardiff University. The principal authors were: Ruth Turley, Alison Weightman, (SURE, Cardiff University), Elizabeth Halstead (Bangor University) and Helen Morgan (SURE, Cardiff University).

  • Economic modelling: 'Managing overweight and obesity among children economic modelling report', was carried out by the UK Health Forum, (formerly the National Heart Forum) and the University of East Anglia. The principal authors were: Martin Brown, Tim Marsh and Ketevan Rtveladze (UK Health Forum) and Ric Fordham (University of East Anglia).

  • Commissioned report: 'Practical and process issues in the provision of lifestyle weight management services for children and young people', was carried out by GK Research. The author was Graham Kelly.

  • Expert papers:

    • Expert paper 1 'Findings of the former Childhood Obesity National Support Team' by Kim Hastie, Head of former Childhood Obesity National Support Team.

    • Expert paper 2 'Implications of the transition of public health responsibilities to local government' by Helen Walters, Greater London Authority

    • Expert paper 3 'Psychological considerations for lifestyle weight management programmes for children and young people, and the use of behaviour change theories' by Andrew Hill, University of Leeds

    • Expert paper 4 'Choosing outcome measures for lifestyle weight management programmes for children' by Maria Bryant, University of Leeds

    • Expert paper 5 'A population-level evaluation of a family-based community intervention for childhood overweight and obesity' by Catherine Law and Helen Roberts, Institute of Child Health, University College, London

    • Expert paper 6 'Effective Behavioural Components for Childhood weight management programmes' by Pinki Sahota, Leeds Metropolitan University.

In some cases the evidence was insufficient and the PDG has made recommendations for future research.

Status of this guidance

The draft guidance, including the recommendations, was released for consultation in April 2013. At its meeting in July 2013, the PDG amended the guidance in light of comments from stakeholders and experts. The guidance was signed off by the NICE Guidance Executive in September 2013.

The guidance is available on NICE's website. The recommendations are also available in a pathway for professionals whose remit includes public health and for interested members of the public.

Implementation

NICE guidance can help:

NICE has developed tools to help organisations put this guidance into practice.

Updating the recommendations

This guidance will be reviewed 3 years after publication to determine whether all or part of it should be updated. Information on the progress of any update will be posted on the NICE website.

Your responsibility

This guidance represents the views of the Institute and was arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. Those working in the NHS, local authorities, the wider public, voluntary and community sectors and the private sector should take it into account when carrying out their professional, managerial or voluntary duties.

Implementation of this guidance is the responsibility of local commissioners and/or providers. Commissioners and providers are reminded that it is their responsibility to implement the guidance, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this guidance should be interpreted in a way which would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.

Copyright

© National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 2013. All rights reserved. NICE copyright material can be downloaded for private research and study, and may be reproduced for educational and not-for-profit purposes. No reproduction by or for commercial organisations, or for commercial purposes, is allowed without the written permission of NICE.

ISBN 978-1-4731-0330-6

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)