12 About this guidance

Why has this guidance been produced?

NICE public health guidance makes recommendations on the promotion of good health and the prevention of ill health.

The Department of Health (DH) asked the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to produce this guidance.

The guidance should be implemented alongside other guidance and regulations (for more details see Implementation and Related NICE guidance).

How was this guidance developed?

The recommendations are based on the best available evidence. They were developed by Programme Development Group (PDG).

Members of the PDG are listed in Membership of the Programme Development Group (PDG) and the NICE project team.

For information on how NICE public health guidance is developed, see the NICE public health guidance process and methods guides.

What evidence is the guidance based on?

The evidence that the PDG considered included:

  • Evidence reviews:

    • Review 1: 'Review of effects of nicotine in secondary care' was carried out by Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, Queen Mary University of London. The principal authors were: Hayden McRobbie, Peter Hajek and Katie Myers.

    • Review 2: 'Smoking cessation interventions in acute and maternity services: review of effectiveness' was carried out by Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, Queen Mary University of London. The principal authors were: Katie Myers, Hayden McRobbie and Peter Hajek.

    • Review 3: 'Smoking cessation interventions in acute and maternity services: review of barriers and facilitators' was carried out by Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, Queen Mary University of London. The principal authors were: Katie Myers, Hayden McRobbie, Oliver West and Peter Hajek.

    • Review 4: 'Effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in mental health services' was carried out by UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, University of Nottingham. The principal authors were: Jo Leonardi-Bee, Leah Jayes, Alison O'Mara-Eves, Clare Stansfield, Kate Gibson, Elena Ratschen and Ann McNeill.

    • Review 5: 'Barriers to and facilitators for smoking cessation interventions in mental health services' was carried out by UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, University of Nottingham. The principal authors were: Jo Leonardi-Bee, Leah Jayes, Alison O'Mara-Eves, Clare Stansfield, Kate Gibson, Elena Ratschen and Ann McNeill.

    • Review 6: 'A review of the effectiveness of smokefree strategies and interventions in secondary care settings' was carried out by University of Stirling and University of Nottingham. The principal authors were: Kathryn Angus, Rachael Murray, Laura MacDonald, Douglas Eadie, Alison O'Mara-Eves, Clare Stansfield and Jo Leonardi-Bee.

    • Review 7: 'A review of the barriers to and facilitators for implementing smokefree strategies and interventions in secondary care settings' was carried out by University of Stirling and University of Nottingham. The principal authors were: Douglas Eadie, Laura MacDonald, Kathryn Angus, Rachael Murray, Alison O'Mara-Eves, Clare Stansfield and Jo Leonardi-Bee.

  • Review of economic evaluations: 'Smoking cessation in secondary care: cost-effectiveness review ' was carried out by Matrix Evidence. The principal authors were: Maria Rizzo, Alison Martin, Victoria Clift-Matthews, Louise Lombard, Oluwaseye Abogunrin, Obinna Onwude, Jacque Mallender and Rupert Lee.

  • Economic modelling: 'Economic analysis of smoking cessation in secondary care' was carried out by Matrix Evidence. The principal authors were: Jacque Mallender, Evelina Bertranou, Mariana Bacelar and Sarah Roberts.

  • Expert papers:

    • Expert paper 1: 'Stop smoking interventions in secondary care' by Liz Gilbert, National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training.

    • Expert paper 2: 'Streamlined secondary care system: project report' by Liz Gilbert, National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training.

    • Expert paper 3: 'Bedside interventions for smoking cessation: A randomised controlled trial of systematic identification and treatment of smokers' by Rachael Murray, UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, University of Nottingham.

    • Expert paper 4: 'Association between smoking and mental disorders' by Jo Leonardi-Bee, UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, University of Nottingham.

    • Expert paper 5: 'The prevalence of smoking in people with mental health problems' by Lisa Szatkowski, UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, University of Nottingham.

    • Expert paper 6: 'Ethical issues for smoking cessation and smokefree policies' by Richard Ashcroft, School of Law, Queen Mary University of London.

    • Expert paper 7: 'Smoking and mental disorder' by Jonathan Campion, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

    • Expert paper 8: 'South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Smoke-free pilot' by Mary Yates, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

The reviews, expert papers and economic analysis are available online.

Note: the views expressed in the expert papers above are the views of the authors and not those of NICE.

In some cases the evidence was insufficient and the PDG has made recommendations for future research.

Status of this guidance

The draft guidance, including the recommendations, was released for consultation in April 2013. At its meeting in July 2013, the PDG amended the guidance in light of comments from stakeholders and experts. The guidance was signed off by the NICE Guidance Executive in October 2013.

The guidance is available on NICE's website. The recommendations are also available in a pathway for professionals whose remit includes public health and for interested members of the public.

Implementation

NICE guidance can help:

NICE has developed tools to help organisations put this guidance into practice.

Updating the recommendations

This guidance will be reviewed 3 years after publication to determine whether all or part of it should be updated. Information on the progress of any update will be posted at the NICE website.

Your responsibility

This guidance represents the views of the Institute and was arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. Those working in the NHS, local authorities, the wider public, voluntary and community sectors and the private sector should take it into account when carrying out their professional, managerial or voluntary duties.

Implementation of this guidance is the responsibility of local commissioners and/or providers. Commissioners and providers are reminded that it is their responsibility to implement the guidance, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this guidance should be interpreted in a way which would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.

Copyright

© National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 2013. All rights reserved. NICE copyright material can be downloaded for private research and study, and may be reproduced for educational and not-for-profit purposes. No reproduction by or for commercial organisations, or for commercial purposes, is allowed without the written permission of NICE.

ISBN: 978-1-4731-0372-6

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)