Smoking cessation - mental health services: call for evidence

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has been asked by the Department of Health (DH) to develop public health guidance on Smoking cessation in secondary care – mental health services

A series of evidence reviews and an economic analysis are being conducted to address the questions that are set out in the scope.

We would like to receive details of evidence that relates to the questions below, based on those set out in the scope. 

Smoking cessation interventions in mental health services

  • How effective and cost effective are smoking cessation interventions in helping people to quit including interventions that:

    - use varenicline

    - target children and young people

    - target staff

    - target carers, partners, parents and other family members of mental health service users.
  • How effective and cost effective are interventions in secondary care mental health settings to help people temporarily abstain from smoking?
  • How effective and cost effective are the current approaches used by secondary care mental health services to identify and refer people to stop-smoking services?
  • How effective and cost effective are the current approaches used by mental healthcare services to identify and provide people with smoking cessation information, advice and support?
  • What is the effect of different service delivery strategies on the uptake of advice and support: for example, should the service be delivered during an in-patient stay or in the community?
  • What type of approaches are effective and cost effective at encouraging secondary care mental health professionals to record smoking status, offer smoking cessation information, advice and support, or to refer people to stop-smoking services?
  • How can community, primary and secondary care mental health service providers collaborate more effectively to provide seamless smoking cessation services?
  • What barriers and facilitators affect the delivery of effective interventions, including the views, perceptions and beliefs of people using mental health services; for example by age, diagnosis or ethnicity?
  • What are the effects of bupropion and varenicline use for smoking cessation on the mental and physical health of people using mental health services, including those who are on medication? Are there any populations or circumstances where use is unsafe?

Smokefree strategies and interventions

  • How effective and cost effective are specific strategies and interventions for ensuring compliance with smoke-free legislation and local smoke-free policies in mental health settings?
  • What factors encourage or discourage compliance with smoke-free policies in mental health settings – including:

    - organisational factors that encourage or discourage compliance with smokefree policies in those settings

    - the views, perceptions and beliefs of people who visit mental healthcare settings; for example, parents, carers or families?

We are interested in identifying UK studies that have been published since 2000 or any ongoing research that is being conducted in the UK that relates to the questions outlined above. We are interested in a broad range of different types of evidence. It may be quantitative or qualitative research. The studies may be published in journals, texts or monographs or be in the grey literature.

In addition to published work other examples include ongoing research, any new technology, studies that have been published only as abstracts, data on adverse effects, economic models, and studies of the experiences of patients, carers or healthcare professionals.

We are particularly interested in evidence related to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and evidence that may help to better promote equality of opportunity relating to age, disability, gender, gender identity, ethnicity, religion and belief, sexual orientation or socio-economic status. Subgroups that may be missed by conventional services are of particular interest, for example people with learning difficulties, the prison population, travellers, refugees and recent migrants.

Please note that the following material is not eligible for consideration:

  • Promotional material.
  • Unsubstantiated or non-evidence-based assertions of effectiveness.
  • Opinion pieces
  • Forms with attachments of published material, or hard copy of published material

Please refer to section 4.4 of the Process Manual for further information on submissions of confidential material.

Published material

Please send either full reference details (which are to include author/s, title, date, journal or publication details including volume and issue number and page numbers), not a PDF/WORD attachment or hard copy, using the evidence submission form for published material by 20 July 2012 to SmokingCessationMentalHealth@nice.org.uk

Unpublished material / ongoing research

If you are aware of trials/ongoing research relevant to our questions which are in progress please could you help us to identify that information by providing relevant information such as a link to a registered trial with the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Clinical Trials).

If you wish to submit academic in confidence material i.e. written but not yet published, or commercial in confidence i.e. internal documentation, please could you highlight which sections are confidential by using the highlighter function in Word.

Please send any relevant evidence details, using the evidence submission form for unpublished material, by 20 July 2012 to SmokingCessationMentalHealth@nice.org.uk.

Or alternatively to:

Denise Jarrett
Project Coordinator - Centre for Public Health Excellence
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence
Level 1A
City Tower
Piccadilly Plaza
Manchester M1 4BD
United Kingdom

We look forward to receiving this information.

Thank you in advance for your help.

This page was last updated: 25 January 2013