Quality statement 2: Education in adrenaline auto‑injector use

Quality statement

People who are prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis are given training in how and when to use it before being discharged.

Rationale

Adrenaline auto‑injectors should be offered to people after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis, as an interim measure before they have a specialist allergy service appointment. It is important to use an adrenaline auto‑injector as soon as possible if an anaphylactic reaction is suspected. Ensuring that people know when and how to use their device will help ensure timely and correct use if they have a further anaphylactic reaction.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements and written protocols to ensure that people who are prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis are given training in how and when to use it before being discharged.

Data source: Local data collection.

Process

Proportion of people who are prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis who are given training in how and when to use it before being discharged.

Numerator – the number in the denominator who are given training in how and when to use an adrenaline auto‑injector before being discharged.

Denominator – the number of people who are prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis.

Data source: Local data collection.

Outcome

a) People who have had a suspected anaphylactic reaction feel able to manage their condition.

Data source: Local data collection.

b) Cases of emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis after an adrenaline auto‑injector has been prescribed.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, healthcare professionals and commissioners

Service providers (such as emergency departments, paediatric and adult medical services) ensure that healthcare professionals can provide training in how and when to use adrenaline auto‑injectors for people who are prescribed adrenaline auto‑injectors after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis. They also ensure that information on using auto‑injectors is available to give to people.

Healthcare professionals (such as emergency department staff, members of paediatric and adult medical services) provide training for people prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis, before they are discharged. They demonstrate correct use, provide an opportunity for the person to practice using a training device, and give people information about how and when to use it.

Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups) ensure that they commission services that can provide training and information on how and when to use adrenaline auto‑injectors for people who have been prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector after emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

People who are prescribed an adrenaline auto‑injector because they have had emergency treatment for suspected anaphylaxis (a severe, life‑threatening allergic reaction) are shown how to use it, can practise using a training injector, and are given information that explains how and when they should use it before they go home from hospital.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Training in how and when to use an adrenaline auto‑injector

This includes a demonstration of using an adrenaline auto‑injector and practice using a training device. Information should also be given about anaphylaxis, including the signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction and what to do if an anaphylactic reaction happens (use the adrenaline auto‑injector and call emergency services).

[Adapted from Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment (NICE guideline CG134), recommendation 1.1.11 and expert opinion]

Equality and diversity considerations

Information provided about using adrenaline auto‑injectors should be accessible to people with additional needs, such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not read or speak English. People receiving information about adrenaline auto‑injectors should have access to an interpreter or advocate if needed.