Quality statement 1: 'Safety netting' information

Quality statement

Parents and carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs are given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Quality measure

Structure: Evidence of local arrangements for parents and carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs to be given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Process: Proportion of parents or carers of children and young people presenting with non‑specific symptoms and signs who are given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who are given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Denominator – the number of parents or carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs.

Outcome: Parent/carer satisfaction with information received.

What the quality statement means for each audience

Service providers ensure systems are in place for parents and carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs to be given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Healthcare professionals give 'safety netting' information to parents and carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs, including information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Commissioners ensure they commission services that enable parents and carers of children and young people presenting with non-specific symptoms and signs to be given 'safety netting' information that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia.

Parents and carers of children and young people with general symptoms are given 'safety netting' information (for example, advice on what symptoms to look out for and how and when to seek further care) that includes information on bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia (blood poisoning).

Source guidance

Fever in under 5: assessment and initial management (2013) NICE guideline CG160, recommendations 1.4.2.3 (key priority for implementation), 1.5.8.2 and 1.7.2.1

Data source

Structure: Local data collection.

Process: Local data collection.

Outcome: Local data collection.

Definitions

Non-specific symptoms and signs are detailed in table 1 of the NICE guideline on meningitis (bacterial) and meningococcal septicaemia in under 16s.

'Safety netting' information comprises oral and/or written information on what symptoms to look out for, how to access further care, likely time course of expected illness and, if appropriate, the uncertainty of the diagnosis.

Information on warning symptoms should include a specific instruction for parents and carers looking after a feverish child to seek further advice if any of the following occur:

  • The child develops a non-blanching rash.

  • The parent or carer feels that the child is less well than when they previously sought advice.

  • The parent or carer is more worried than when they previously sought advice.

  • The fever lasts longer than 5 days.

  • The parent or carer is distressed, or concerned that they are unable to look after the child.

  • The child is lethargic or irritable.

  • The child stops feeding (infants only).

  • The child has a fit.