Quality statement 2: Written personalised action plan

Quality statement

People aged 5 years and over with asthma discuss and agree a written personalised action plan. [2013, updated 2018]

Rationale

Involving people with asthma (including their families and carers as appropriate) in developing a written personalised action plan can help them to respond to changes in their symptoms, enabling them to self-manage their asthma and reduce the risk of serious asthma attacks and hospital admission. Regular reviews of the action plan with a healthcare professional can help to prevent complications arising.

Quality measures

Structure

a) Evidence of a local framework and guidance for healthcare professionals on providing asthma education and developing a written personalised action plan for people aged 5 years and over with asthma.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, service protocol.

b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that people aged 5 years and over with asthma discuss and agree a written personalised action plan with their healthcare professional.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, service protocol.

Process

a) Proportion of people aged 5 years and over with asthma who have a record of a discussion to agree a written personalised action plan.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who have a record of a discussion to agree a written personalised action plan.

Denominator – the number of people aged 5 years and over with asthma.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, audit of patient health records.

b) Proportion of people aged 5 years and over with asthma who have a documented written personalised action plan.

Numerator – the number of people in the denominator who have a documented written personalised action plan.

Denominator – the number of people aged 5 years and over with asthma.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, audit of patient health records.

Outcome

a) Rate of hospital attendance or admission for an asthma attack.

Data source: NHS Digital's Hospital Episode Statistics includes data on admissions and A&E attendances for asthma attack.

b) Satisfaction of people with asthma aged 5 years and over and their family and carers (as appropriate) that they are able to self-manage their condition and their asthma is well controlled.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, patient and carer surveys.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (such as GP practices, community health services and hospitals) ensure that processes are in place to involve people aged 5 years and over with asthma, and their family and carers as appropriate, in developing a written personalised action plan and to provide education to help them self-manage their asthma. Service providers ensure that written personalised action plans are reviewed regularly, including after an asthma attack.

Healthcare professionals (such as doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants and pharmacists) involve people aged 5 years and over with asthma, and their family and carers as appropriate, in developing a written personalised action plan and provide education to help them self-manage their asthma. Healthcare professionals regularly involve people with asthma in reviewing and updating their written personalised action plan, including after an asthma attack.

Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups and NHS England) commission services that involve people aged 5 years and over with asthma, and their family and carers as appropriate, in developing and reviewing a written personalised action plan and provide education to help them self-manage their asthma. Commissioners should ensure consistency by providing a local framework and guidance to healthcare professionals on developing and reviewing written personalised action plans and providing education for people with asthma.

People aged 5 years and over with asthma have their own asthma care plan, which helps them take their asthma medicines and know what to do if the medicines are not working (with support from their family and carers as appropriate). Their healthcare professional gives them (and their family and carers as appropriate) information about asthma, involves them in developing the plan and helps them to use it. The care plan is reviewed regularly with the person's healthcare professional and also reviewed after an asthma attack.

Source guidance

Asthma: diagnosis, monitoring and chronic asthma management (2017) NICE guideline NG80, recommendation 1.10.1

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Written personalised action plan

A written personalised action plan (such as Asthma UK's asthma action plan) should be tailored to the person with asthma, enabling them to recognise when symptoms are worse. The plan should set out actions to be taken if asthma control deteriorates and who to contact.

[British Thoracic Society and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network's (BTS/SIGN) guideline on management of asthma, recommendation 5.2.2, and expert opinion]

Equality and diversity considerations

Healthcare professionals should have a discussion with family or carers of children under 5 years with symptoms of asthma to agree if a written personalised action plan would be helpful.

The personalised action plan should be provided in an accessible format and tailored to meet individual needs, taking into consideration a person's capacity and their ability to care for themselves. Additional support may be needed for people with learning disabilities to ensure that they can be involved in the discussion and are able to understand how to use their plan.