Acute coronary syndromes (including myocardial infarction)

Acute coronary syndromes (including myocardial infarction)

The quality standard for acute coronary syndromes (including myocardial infarction) is made up of 6 statements that describe high-quality care for adults with acute coronary syndromes (including myocardial infarction). These statements set out the quality of care you should receive.

1. Adults with severe pain in the chest and/or in other areas (for example, the arms, back or jaw) that might be a heart attack (a suspected acute coronary syndrome) are only given a diagnosis of heart attack if their signs and symptoms meet an agreed definition.

2. Adults with heart conditions called NSTEMI and unstable angina have their risk of another heart attack estimated to guide their treatment.

3. Adults with heart conditions called NSTEMI and unstable angina who have a medium or higher risk of another heart attack are offered a test called coronary angiography, and treatment to improve blood flow to the heart if needed, within 72 hours of first being admitted to hospital.

4. Adults with heart conditions called NSTEMI and unstable angina and whose condition is unstable are offered a test called coronary angiography, and treatment to improve blood flow to the heart if needed, as soon as possible but within 24 hours of their condition becoming unstable.

5. Adults who are unconscious after a type of heart attack called STEMI can have a test called coronary angiography, and treatment to improve blood flow to the heart if needed, even though they are unconscious.

6. Adults with a type of heart attack called STEMI whose symptoms started no more than 12 hours before first contacting a healthcare professional are offered a procedure to improve blood flow to the heart (called percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI). They should be able to have this as soon as possible, but within 120 minutes of when they could have received fibrinolysis (a 'clot-busting' drug).

  • Information Standard