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  1. Evidence on the efficacy of open prenatal repair of open neural tube defects in the fetus is adequate in quantity and quality. However, evidence on its safety shows serious but well recognised safety concerns for the mother and fetus. Therefore, this procedure should only be used with  special arrangements   for clinical governance, consent, and audit or research.

    Recommendation ID IPG668 Question Evidence on the efficacy of open prenatal repair of open neural tube defects in the fetus is adequate

  2. The committee noted that there was no clinical evidence showing that having patiromer improved length or quality of life or allowed patients to stay on optimal doses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors. It therefore considered that it would be valuable to have studies comparing patiromer plus standard care with standard care alone in people with confirmed hyperkalaemia of 6.0 mmol/litre and above, and that these should investigate: - mortality- disease progression- patterns of RAAS inhibitor use- healthcare utilisation and- health-related quality of life. The committee recalled that the DIAMOND trial is ongoing and may help to provide evidence on mortality (see section 3.11). However, the trial is not going to complete until 2022. The committee concluded that the guidance should be reviewed when evidence from DIAMOND is available.

    Recommendation ID TA623/1 Question The committee noted that there was no clinical evidence showing that having patiromer improved length

  3. Most women will need to use contraception for more than 30 years. Patterns of contraceptive use vary with age, ethnicity, marital status, fertility intention, education and lifestyle. Large prospective cohort studies are needed to identify: patterns of use (initiation, continuation and switching between methods) of LARC methods compared with non‑LARC methods factors that influence the patterns of use of LARC.

    Recommendation ID CG30/2 Question Most women will need to use contraception for more than 30 years. Patterns of contraceptive use vary

  4. The evidence on percutaneous insertion of a cerebral protection device to prevent cerebral embolism during TAVI raises no major safety concerns other than those associated with the TAVI procedure. However, the evidence on efficacy for preventing TAVI-related stroke is inconclusive. Therefore, this procedure should only be used with  special arrangements   for clinical governance, consent, and audit or research.

    Recommendation ID IPG650/1 Question The evidence on percutaneous insertion of a cerebral protection device to prevent cerebral embolism

  5. Current evidence on the safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the leg shows there are well-recognised but infrequent complications. For distal DVT that does not extend into the common femoral vein the evidence on efficacy is inconclusive, therefore this procedure should only be used in the context of  research .

    Recommendation ID IPG651/2 Question Current evidence on the safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis

  6. Current evidence on the safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the leg shows there are well-recognised but infrequent complications. For acute iliofemoral DVT the evidence on efficacy is limited in quality and quantity, therefore this procedure should only be used with  special arrangements   for clinical governance, consent, and audit or research.

    Recommendation ID IPG651/1 Question Current evidence on the safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis

  7. How do the newer AEDs compare in efficacy to the standard AEDs in the treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy? Focal seizures: carbamazepine, eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, pregabalin  and zonisamide. Generalised seizures: lamotrigine, levetiracetam, sodium valproate and zonisamide.

    Recommendation ID CG137/1 Question How do the newer AEDs compare in efficacy to the standard AEDs in the treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy