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  1. What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of family therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT‑A) compared with each other and with individual CBT in young people aged 12 to 18 years with moderate to severe depression?

    Recommendation ID NG134/3 Question What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of family

  2. What is the most clinically and cost-effective follow‑up protocol for people with prostate cancer who have had radical treatment, with specific regard to risk stratification, duration of follow‑up, frequency of follow‑up appointments, the type of examination or blood tests, and the roles of primary and secondary care in follow‑up?

    Recommendation ID NG131/2 Question What is the most clinically and cost-effective follow‑up protocol for people with prostate cancer who

  3. What is the most suitable surveillance protocol (including the role of digital rectal examination [DRE] and prostate-specific antigen [PSA] measures) for people for whom active surveillance is appropriate, as assessed by multiparametric MRI and biopsy, when there are no clinical concerns during follow‑up?

    Recommendation ID NG131/1 Question What is the most suitable surveillance protocol (including the role of digital rectal examination [DRE]

  4. The committee recommended that data should be collected to evaluate the system impact of adopting the lead‑I ECGs on both primary and secondary care. In particular, data should be collected on how ECGs generated by the devices would be interpreted in practice, including staff time needed to interpret the ECG traces and associated costs.

    Recommendation ID DG35/2 Question The committee recommended that data should be collected to evaluate the system impact of adopting the

  5. The effect of injectable contraceptives on bone mineral density in women who have used DMPA for longer than 2 years is uncertain. Adequately powered surveys or cross‑sectional studies are needed to examine the recovery of bone mineral density after discontinuation of DMPA after long‑term and very long‑term use. Studies are also needed to examine the risk of bone fractures in older women.

    Recommendation ID CG30/4 Question The effect of injectable contraceptives on bone mineral density in women who have used DMPA for longer

  6. What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of a brief psychosocial intervention as reported by the IMPACT trial, but delivered by practitioners other than psychiatrists and in other settings, including primary care, to young people aged 12 to 18 years with mild or moderate to severe depression?

    Recommendation ID NG134/4 Question What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of a brief

  7. In patients with negative MRI (Likert score 1 or 2), what is the next best diagnostic investigation to rule out clinically significant prostate cancer? What is the diagnostic accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy compared with transperineal non-mapping biopsy in the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer?

    Recommendation ID NG131/7 Question In patients with negative MRI (Likert score 1 or 2), what is the next best diagnostic investigation

  8. What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of supported digital cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) compared with unsupported digital CBT in young people aged 12 to 18 years with mild depression, and what are the key components of the interventions that influence effectiveness?

    Recommendation ID NG134/2 Question What is the clinical and cost effectiveness, post-treatment and at longer-term follow‑up, of supported

  9. The committee recommended further research to determine if using the lead‑I electrocardiogram (ECG) devices in primary care for people with signs or symptoms of atrial fibrillation, and an irregular pulse, increases the number of people with atrial fibrillation (including paroxysmal) detected,  ompared with current practice (that is, a 12‑lead ECG done later). The committee considered the feasibility of collecting data to see if using the lead‑I ECG devices increased the detection of atrial fibrillation that would be missed if only 12‑lead ECGs done later were available. It noted that even if a lead‑I ECG is used and atrial fibrillation is detected, a subsequent 12‑lead ECG would still be done to check for structural cardiac abnormalities and inform further management decisions. The committee concluded that practices using lead‑I ECG devices could determine the number of additional cases of atrial fibrillation detected by the devices. This can be done by identifying people with a confirmed positive lead‑I ECG for atrial fibrillation who subsequently had a 12‑lead ECG that was negative because the atrial fibrillation had stopped. The committee also considered that data collected on the time between the initial lead‑I ECG and the subsequent 12‑lead ECG would be useful.

    Recommendation ID DG35/1 Question The committee recommended further research to determine if using the lead‑I electrocardiogram (ECG) devices

  10. Few women use contraception perfectly (that is, exactly in accordance with the product instructions) and consistently. Pregnancy rates during typical use reflect effectiveness of a method among women who use the method incorrectly or inconsistently. Few data are available on typical use of any contraceptive method among women in the UK. Much of the data on contraceptive effectiveness used in the guideline come from clinical trials or surveys undertaken in other countries such as the USA. Large prospective cohort studies are needed to compare the contraceptive effectiveness of LARC methods with non‑LARC methods during typical use in the UK.

    Recommendation ID CG30/1 Question Few women use contraception perfectly (that is, exactly in accordance with the product instructions)

  11. In addition to individual circumstances and needs, a woman's choice and acceptance of LARC may be influenced by potential health disbenefits (side effects and risks) as well as non‑contraceptive benefits of LARC (such as alleviation of menorrhagia). Large population studies of appropriate design are needed to determine the effect of these factors on the uptake of LARC methods and the implications for NHS resources.

    Recommendation ID CG30/3 Question In addition to individual circumstances and needs, a woman's choice and acceptance of LARC may be influenced

  12. Most women will need to use contraception for more than 30 years. Patterns of contraceptive use vary with age, ethnicity, marital status, fertility intention, education and lifestyle. Large prospective cohort studies are needed to identify: patterns of use (initiation, continuation and switching between methods) of LARC methods compared with non‑LARC methods factors that influence the patterns of use of LARC.

    Recommendation ID CG30/2 Question Most women will need to use contraception for more than 30 years. Patterns of contraceptive use vary