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7 results for Women's health

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  1. Bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis), acute exacerbation: antimicrobial prescribing (NG117)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for managing and preventing acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis). It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

  2. Urinary tract infection (catheter-associated): antimicrobial prescribing (NG113)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for catheter-associated urinary tract infection in children, young people and adults. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

  3. Urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing (NG109)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for lower urinary tract infection (also called cystitis) in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

  4. Urinary tract infection (recurrent): antimicrobial prescribing (NG112)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

  5. Pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG111)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute pyelonephritis (upper urinary tract infection) in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

  6. Otitis media (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG91)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute otitis media (ear infection). It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute otitis media can be caused by viruses or bacteria. It lasts for about a week, and most children get better in 3 days without antibiotics. Serious complications are rare.

  7. Sore throat (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG84)

    This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute sore throat. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute sore throat is often caused by a virus, lasts for about a week, and most people get better without antibiotics. Withholding antibiotics rarely leads to complications.