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27 results for Sepsis

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  1. Sepsis: recognition, diagnosis and early management (NG51)

    This guideline covers the recognition, diagnosis and early management of sepsis for all populations. The guideline committee identified that the key issues to be included were: recognition and early assessment, diagnostic and prognostic value of blood markers for sepsis, initial treatment, escalating care, identifying the source of infection, early monitoring, information and support for patients and carers, and training and education.

  2. Neutropenic sepsis: prevention and management in people with cancer (CG151)

    This guideline covers preventing, identifying and managing neutropenic sepsis in children, young people and adults receiving treatment for cancer in the community and in secondary and tertiary care. It aims to reduce the risk of infection in people with neutropenia (low number of white blood cells) who are receiving anticancer treatment and improve management of neutropenic sepsis.

  3. Neonatal infection (early onset): antibiotics for prevention and treatment (CG149)

    This guideline covers preventing infection within 72 hours of birth in healthy babies, treating pregnant women whose baby is at risk, and caring for babies who have a suspected or confirmed infection. It aims to reduce delays in recognising and treating sick babies and prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  4. Diverticular disease: diagnosis and management (NG147)

    This guideline covers the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease in people aged 18 years and over. It aims to improve diagnosis and care and help people get timely information and advice, including advice about symptoms and when to seek help.

  5. Developmental follow-up of children and young people born preterm (NG72)

    This guideline covers the developmental follow-up of babies, children and young people under 18 years who were born preterm (before 37+0 weeks of pregnancy). It explains the risk of different developmental problems and disorders, and specifies what extra assessments and support children born preterm might need during their growth and development.

  6. Acute kidney injury: prevention, detection and management (NG148)

    This guideline covers preventing, detecting and managing acute kidney injury in children, young people and adults. It aims to improve assessment and detection by non-specialists, and specifies when people should be referred to specialist services. This will improve early recognition and treatment, and reduce the risk of complications in people with acute kidney injury.

  7. Inducing labour (CG70)

    This guideline covers circumstances, methods and monitoring for inducing labour in pregnant women to avoid a pregnancy lasting longer than 42 weeks (known as a prolonged pregnancy) or if a woman’s waters break but labour does not start. It aims to improve the advice and care provided to women considering and undergoing induction of labour in hospital-based maternity units, midwifery led units and at home.

  8. Haematological cancers: improving outcomes (NG47)

    This guideline covers integrated diagnostic reporting for diagnosing haematological cancer in adults, young people and children. It also covers staffing, facilities (levels of care) and multidisciplinary teams needed for adults and young people. It aims to improve care for people with suspected or diagnosed cancer by promoting best practice on the organisation of haematological cancer services.

  9. Neonatal parenteral nutrition (NG154)

    This guideline covers parenteral nutrition (intravenous feeding) for babies born preterm, up to 28 days after their due birth date and babies born at term, up to 28 days after their birth. Parenteral nutrition is often needed by preterm babies, critically ill babies, and babies who need surgery.

  10. Intravenous fluid therapy in adults in hospital (CG174)

    This guideline covers the general principles for managing intravenous (IV) fluid therapy in hospital inpatients aged 16 and over with a range of conditions. It aims to help prescribers understand the optimal amount and composition of IV fluids to be administered and the best rate at which to give them, to improve fluid prescribing and outcomes among people in hospital. It does not cover pregnant women, and those with severe liver or renal disease, diabetes or burns.

  11. Fever in under 5s: assessment and initial management (NG143)

    This guideline covers the assessment and early management of fever with no obvious cause in children aged under 5. It aims to improve clinical assessment and help healthcare professionals diagnose serious illness among young children who present with fever in primary and secondary care.

  12. Nutrition support for adults: oral nutrition support, enteral tube feeding and parenteral nutrition (CG32)

    This guideline covers identifying and caring for adults who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition in hospital or in their own home or a care home. It offers advice on how oral, enteral tube feeding and parenteral nutrition support should be started, administered and stopped. It aims to support healthcare professionals identify malnourished people and help them to choose the most appropriate form of support.

  13. Pressure ulcers: prevention and management (CG179)

    This guideline covers risk assessment, prevention and treatment in children, young people and adults at risk of, or who have, a pressure ulcer (also known as a bedsore or pressure sore). It aims to reduce the number of pressure ulcers in people admitted to secondary or tertiary care or receiving NHS care in other settings, such as primary and community care and emergency departments.

  14. Diabetic foot problems: prevention and management (NG19)

    This guideline covers preventing and managing foot problems in children, young people and adults with diabetes. It aims to reduce variation in practice, including antibiotic prescribing for diabetic foot infections.

  15. Postnatal care up to 8 weeks after birth (CG37)

    This guideline covers the routine postnatal care women and their babies should receive for 6–8 weeks after the birth. It includes advice given on breastfeeding, and the management of common and serious health problems in women and their babies after the birth.