Shared learning database

 
Organisation:
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Published date:
October 2006

The development of a model that can be used to coordinate the implementation of NICE guidance initially within the trust and also across Sheffield.

Guidance the shared learning relates to:
None
Does the example relate to a general implementation of all NICE guidance?
Yes
Does the example relate to a specific implementation of a specific piece of NICE guidance?
No

Example

Aims and objectives

To develop a model that can be used to coordinate the implementation of NICE guidance initially within the trust and also across Sheffield. 1. To develop a model that clearly identifies the key stages of implementation. 2. To ensure progress can be effectively monitored.

Reasons for implementing your project

The impending merger of two NHS trusts in 2001 provided the impetus to evaluate existing models that were in use both within the acute and primary care sectors, in relation to implementing NICE guidance. A decision was taken to develop a new model that would clearly illustrate the key stages of implementation. The model is underpinned by a number of systems and processes to enable information and data collection at specific points in order to provide internal and external assurance that progress is being made. The operational detail behind some of the stages is different for primary, secondary and community care to reflect the differences in their organisational arrangements, however, fixed points of cross over define it as a unified model.

How did you implement the project

1. The Sheffield Ten Stage Implementation Model has been developed and is now in use across Sheffield. 2. Progress is monitored through clinical audits wherever possible. Other forms of data are also used to provide compliance statements. 3. The model forms the basis both for monitoring all aspects of the implementation process and providing progress trackers to groups both within the trust and across the city.

Key findings

The model provides a clear starting point and an ultimate end point, however, in the majority of cases, implementation is not a linear process and this must be taken into account. The various local trackers that have been produced since the model came into existence not only provide evidence that progress is being made over a period of time, but are also available to support internal and external performance management and assessment requirements. Articles have been published which provide further insight into the detail of the model. Available at:- Journal of Clinical Excellence, Bond,B. Volume 4, Number 3, 2002, pages 298-300. Clinician in Management, Somers,A., Bond,B., Parmakis,G., Hendra,T. Volume 13, Numbers 3-4, 2005, pages 171-176.

Key learning points

It is particularly useful to have some sort of model or pathway to follow. Any model that is developed needs to be flexible to promote and encourage local ownership. Do not reinvent the wheel - utilise existing expertise and networks to collate information. Try to encourage clinicians to think about data collection to be able to assess compliance, the most effective of which will be robust clinical audit.

Contact details

Name:
Beverly A Bond
Job:
Clinical Effectiveness and Audit Information Co-ordinator
Organisation:
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Email:
Beverly.bond@sth.nhs.uk

Sector:
Secondary care
Is the example industry-sponsored in any way?
No