Update information

April 2017: We updated a recommendation in section 1.3 on corticosteroid treatment for people with severe alcoholic hepatitis.

Recommendations are marked as [2017], [2010, amended 2017] or [2010].

[2017] indicates that the evidence was reviewed and the recommendation updated in 2017.

[2010, amended 2017] indicates that the evidence was reviewed in 2010, but changes were made to the recommendation wording in 2017 that changed the meaning.

[2010] indicates that the evidence was reviewed in 2010.

Recommendations that have been amended in 2017

Recommendation in 2010 guideline

Recommendation in current guideline

Reason for change

In people with delirium tremens, offer oral lorazepam12 as first-line treatment. If symptoms persist or oral medication is declined, give parenteral lorazepam12, haloperidol13 or olanzapine14. (1.1.4.1)

In people with delirium tremens, offer oral lorazepam7 as first-line treatment. If symptoms persist or oral medication is declined, offer parenteral lorazepam7 or haloperidol8. [2010, amended 2017] (1.1.4.1)

Olanzapine has been removed because this formulation of olanzapine is no longer available.

Refer patients with decompensated liver disease to be considered for assessment for liver transplantation if they:

• still have decompensated liver disease after best management and 3 months' abstinence from alcohol and

• are otherwise suitable candidates for liver transplantation15. (1.3.2.1)

15 See the nationally agreed guidelines for liver transplant assessment in the context of alcohol-related liver disease.

Refer patients with decompensated liver disease to be considered for assessment for liver transplantation if they:

• still have decompensated liver disease after best management and 3 months' abstinence from alcohol and

• are otherwise suitable candidates for liver transplantation. [2010, amended 2017] (1.3.2.1)

The footnote has been removed because these guidelines are no longer available online.

ISBN: 978-1-4731-2477-6

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)