Figures and tables to support chances of conception and embryo quality recommendations

Table 1 Cumulative probability of conceiving a clinical pregnancy by the number of menstrual cycles

Cumulative probability of conceiving a clinical pregnancy by the number of menstrual cycles attempting to conceive in different age categories (assuming vaginal intercourse occurs twice per week) (Reproduced with permission: Dunson DB, Baird DD, Colombo B [2004]. Increased infertility with age in men and women. Obstetrics and Gynecology 103: 51–6).

Age category (years)

Pregnant after 1 year (12 cycles) (%)

Pregnant after 2 years (24 cycles) (%)

19–26

92

98

27–29

87

95

30–34

86

94

35–39

82

90

Table 2 Cumulative probability of conceiving a clinical pregnancy by the number of cycles of insemination

Cumulative probability of conceiving a clinical pregnancy by the number of cycles of insemination in different age categories and according to the method and sperm status where assisted reproduction technology is used (see the full guideline for full references).

Woman's age (years)

ICI using thawed semen

(Schwartz et al. 1982)

Woman's age (years)

ICI using fresh semen (van Noord-Zaadstra, 1991)

Woman's age (years)

IUI using thawed semen – HFEA data and personal communication

6 cycles

12 cycles

6 cycles

12 cycles

6 cycles

12 cycles

<30

50%

70%

<31

58%

76%

30–34

43%

62%

31–35

50%

71%

<35

63%

86%

>34

33%

54%

>35

39%

55%

35–39

50%

75%

Abbreviations: ICI, intracervical insemination; IUI, intrauterine insemination.

Figure 1 The effect of maternal age on the average rate of pregnancy

Calculated on the basis of studies in 10 different populations that did not use contraceptives (Heffner 2004[11], based on 2 reviews by Menken et al. 1986 and Anderson et al. 2000).

Figure 2 IVF success in terms of live births per 100 embryo transfers

The vertical axis shows embryo transfers; the horizontal axis shows age of woman (based on all 52,996 embryo transfers using the woman's own eggs undertaken in the UK between 1 October 2007 and 30 June 2009) [HFEA, personal communication] (note: small numbers of women aged under 24 years in the HFEA database).

Figure 3 UK NEQAS embryo morphology scheme



[11] Adapted from Heffner LJ (2004). Advanced maternal age – how old is too old? New England Journal of Medicine 351: 1927–9.

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)