Quality statement 1: Raising awareness – health promotion interventions

Quality statement

People accessing behaviour change interventions and programmes in mid-life are advised that the risk of developing dementia can be reduced by making lifestyle changes. [new 2019]

Rationale

There is limited awareness among both the public and practitioners that the risk of developing some types of dementia can be reduced, or the onset or progression delayed, through lifestyle changes. Making this clear in interventions and programmes that promote behaviour change, such as NHS Health Checks and stop smoking services, should encourage changes in behaviour in mid-life, which could lead to fewer people developing dementia in later life.

Quality measures

Structure

a) Evidence that service specifications for behaviour change interventions and programmes include actions to raise awareness of lifestyle changes that could reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, local service specifications.

b) Evidence that training for practitioners delivering behaviour change interventions and programmes includes how to advise and support people to reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, local service specifications.

c) Evidence that information about the link between unhealthy behaviours and the risk of developing dementia is included in local health promotion materials.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, local health promotion leaflets or websites.

Process

Proportion of people attending behaviour change interventions and programmes in mid-life who are advised that the risk of developing dementia can be reduced by making lifestyle changes.

Numerator –the number in the denominator who are advised that the risk of developing dementia can be reduced by making lifestyle changes.

Denominator – the number of people attending behaviour change interventions and programmes in mid-life.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, local audit of patient records.

Outcomes

a) Public awareness of the link between dementia and lifestyle.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, public surveys.

b) Uptake of healthy lifestyle choices.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, public surveys. Public Health England's Public Health Outcomes Framework data includes data on portions of fruit and vegetables consumed, physical activity, smoking prevalence, alcohol-related admissions and social isolation of adults using social care. Public Health England also has national profiles on physical activity, alcohol and tobacco control.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (stop smoking services, leisure services, NHS Health Checks and other health and wellbeing service providers) ensure that staff delivering behaviour change interventions and programmes are aware of lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of developing dementia, and offer advice on reducing this risk.

Health and public health practitioners (such as health improvement practitioners, health trainers, GPs, nurses, pharmacists and stop smoking advisers) are aware of the lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of developing dementia and offer advice on reducing this risk.

Commissioners (such as clinical commissioning groups and local authorities) ensure that service specifications for behaviour change interventions and programmes include the lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of developing dementia and the actions needed to raise awareness of these. They ensure that services delivering these interventions and programmes offer advice on reducing the risk of dementia.

People having NHS Health Checks or taking part in health and wellbeing programmes in mid-life are told about lifestyle changes they can make to reduce their risk of developing dementia.

Source guidance

Dementia, disability and frailty in later life – mid-life approaches to delay or prevent onset (2015) NICE guideline NG16, recommendations 2, 4 and 9

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Mid-life

Adults aged 40 to 64 years. Adults aged 39 years or under from disadvantaged populations may also be considered (this group is at increased risk of ill health and more likely to develop multiple morbidities).

[Adapted from NICE's guideline on dementia, disability and frailty in later life, What is this guideline about?]

Lifestyle changes

Behaviours such as smoking, lack of physical activity, unhealthy diet, alcohol consumption, being overweight or obese, and loneliness that can be changed to reduce the risk of developing dementia.

[NICE's guideline on dementia, disability and frailty in later life, recommendation 3]

Equality and diversity considerations

People should be provided with information about the risk factors for dementia that they can easily read and understand themselves, or with support. Information should be in a format that suits their needs and preferences. It should be accessible to people who do not speak or read English, and it should be culturally appropriate and age appropriate.