Quality statement 6: Monitoring systemic therapy

Quality statement

People with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy are monitored in accordance with locally agreed protocols.

Rationale

Systemic therapy for psoriasis poses a risk of adverse events, for which careful monitoring is needed. It is essential that monitoring is in accordance with national drug guidelines to minimise this risk. Where shared care arrangements are in place, it is important that the roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals involved in monitoring people with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy are clearly outlined in a formalised local agreement.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements for people with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy to be monitored in accordance with locally agreed protocols.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, healthcare practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for people with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy to be monitored in accordance with locally agreed protocols.

Healthcare practitioners ensure that people with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy are monitored in accordance with locally agreed protocols.

Commissioners ensure that they commission services for people with psoriasis receiving systemic therapy to be monitored in accordance with locally agreed protocols.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

People with psoriasis receiving drug treatment known as 'systemic therapy' are monitored according to a locally agreed procedure.

Source guidance

Psoriasis: assessment and management (2012, updated 2017) NICE guideline CG153, recommendations 1.5.1.1 and 1.5.1.5

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Systemic therapy includes biological and non-biological therapies.

Responsibility for use of systemic therapy should be in specialist consultant-led settings only. Certain aspects of supervision and monitoring may be delegated to other healthcare professionals and completed in non-specialist settings. In such cases, the arrangements should be formalised.

Monitoring should be in accordance with locally agreed protocols that incorporate national accredited drug guidelines and policy.

Relevant national accredited drug guidelines include the following: