Quality statement 3: Initial assessment – advice on lifestyle interventions

Quality statement

Men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated are given written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Rationale

It is important to offer advice on lifestyle interventions as soon as possible so that the man is aware of all the options that might help to manage his condition. The content of this advice should be holistic and cover the benefits of attaining and maintaining a healthy weight, exercise and healthy eating. Also, the man should be given advice on specific health interventions, such as altering the type, quantity and timing of fluid and food intake, pelvic floor exercises and bladder training.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated are given written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Data source: Local data collection.

Process

Proportion of men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated who are given written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Numerator – the number of men in the denominator who are given written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Denominator – the number of men who present with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated.

Data source: Local data collection.

Outcome

Men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated feel informed about lifestyle options that might help to manage their condition.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, healthcare professionals and commissioners

Service providers ensure that local arrangements are in place to provide men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Healthcare professionals provide men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

Commissioners ensure that they commission services with local arrangements to provide men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated written advice on lifestyle interventions, as part of their initial assessment.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Men with LUTS whose symptoms are not bothersome or complicated are given written advice, as part of their initial assessment, on diet and fluid intake and avoiding things that can irritate the bladder (for example, certain foods, caffeine and smoking). They are also given information about special exercises to improve their symptoms.

Source guidance

  • Lower urinary tract symptoms (NICE clinical guideline 97), recommendation 1.1.12.

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Advice on lifestyle interventions

Advice on lifestyle interventions should be holistic and cover the benefits of attaining and maintaining a healthy weight, exercise and healthy eating. Also, the man should be advised on specific health interventions, such as altering the type, quantity and timing of fluid and food intake and avoiding bladder irritants (for example, certain foods, caffeine and smoking). Advice should also include information about pelvic floor exercises and bladder training.

Initial assessment

Initial assessment refers to the first assessment within the assessment process, carried out in any setting by a healthcare professional without specific training in managing LUTS in men. Initial assessment may involve a range of assessments as outlined in NICE clinical guideline 97 depending on the presenting symptoms. Based on expert consensus, the initial assessment may involve more than 1 consultation but normally no more than 3 consultations.

Written advice

Written advice may be presented in leaflet form, but may also be presented in picture format or demonstrated online.

Equality and diversity considerations

All written advice should be accessible to men with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. Men receiving information should have access to an interpreter or advocate if needed.

Men should be provided with information that reflects any religious, ethnic, transgender or cultural needs.