Quality statement 1: Lifestyle advice

Quality statement

People who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive are given advice on the impact that lifestyle can have on their chances of getting pregnant.

Rationale

Lifestyle factors, including body weight, smoking, alcohol and recreational drug use can have an impact on people's chances of getting pregnant. People who are trying to have a baby and are concerned it is taking longer than expected, should be given written and verbal advice about changes that can be made to their lifestyle that can help. This information should be provided for both men and women. Positive outcomes from lifestyle change interventions may reduce the need for onward referrals.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive are given written and verbal advice on the impact that lifestyle (including body weight, smoking, alcohol and recreational drug use) can have on their chances of getting pregnant.

Data source: Local data collection.

Process

Proportion of people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive who are given written and verbal advice on the impact that lifestyle (including body weight, smoking, alcohol and recreational drug use) can have on their chances of getting pregnant.

Numerator – the number in the denominator given written and verbal advice on the impact that lifestyle (including body weight, smoking, alcohol and recreational drug use) can have on their chances of getting pregnant.

Denominator – the number of people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive.

Data source: Local data collection. NICE clinical audit tool for fertility: people concerned about delays in conception: audit standard 1b.

Outcome

People who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive feel informed about the impact that lifestyle can have on their chances of getting pregnant.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, healthcare professionals and public health practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers (such as primary care, fertility, pre‑conception advice and gynaecology services) ensure that written information about the impact of lifestyle on fertility is available to share with people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive.

Healthcare professionals and public health practitioners give written and verbal information about the impact of lifestyle on fertility to people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive.

Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups and NHS England area teams) ensure that primary, secondary, community and specialist fertility care providers give written and verbal information about the impact of lifestyle on fertility to people who are concerned that it is taking longer than expected to conceive.

What the quality statement means for patients

People who are concerned that it is taking them longer than expected to become pregnant are given advice (both spoken and in writing) on how their lifestyle can affect their chances of getting pregnant, especially if they smoke, drink alcohol, use recreational drugs or are over or underweight.

Source guidance

  • Fertility (2013) NICE guideline CG156, recommendations 1.2.3.1–3, 1.2.4.1–4, 1.2.6.1–4 and 1.2.10.1.

Equality and diversity considerations

Information given about fertility problems should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. People with fertility problems should have access to an interpreter or advocate if needed.