Quality statement 2: Travel routes

Quality statement

Local authorities develop and maintain connected travel routes that prioritise pedestrians, cyclists and people who use public transport.

Rationale

Transport systems and the wider built environment can influence people's ability to be active. When developing and maintaining travel routes, pedestrians, cyclists and users of other modes of transport including public transport that involve physical activity should be given the highest priority over motorised transport (cars, motorbikes and mopeds, for example).

The attractiveness of active travel is affected by distance, the nature and quality of a route and its access and safety. Improved travel route design that is maintained to a high standard will provide the greatest opportunity for people to move more in their day-to-day lives. It is important to encourage safe, convenient active travel that is accessible for everyone, including older people and people with limited mobility.

Quality measures

Structure

a) Evidence that local authorities develop and maintain travel routes that prioritise pedestrians, cyclists and people who use public transport.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, review of local authority travel route plans, Local Plans, joint strategic needs assessments, and health and wellbeing board strategy.

b) Evidence that local authorities reallocate road space to support walking and cycling.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, Local Plans, local authority travel route and transport plans.

c) Evidence that local authorities implement plans to make it as easy as possible for people with limited mobility to move around their local area.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, Local Plans, local authority travel route plans and meeting minutes with relevant third sector organisations.

Outcomes

a) Percentage of adults cycling for travel at least three days per week.

Data source: National data on adult sport and physical activity is available from Sport England's Active Lives Survey and Public Health England's Physical Activity tool.

b) Percentage of adults walking for travel at least three days per week.

Data source: National data on adult sport and physical activity is available from Sport England's Active Lives Survey and Public Health England's Physical Activity tool.

c) Number of people reported killed or seriously injured casualties.

Data source: National data on road safety by gender, road user type and age in Great Britain is available from Department for Transport's Reported road casualties Great Britain: annual report 2014.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Local authorities (local transport, local planning and public health teams) develop policies and initiatives to ensure that safe, convenient, inclusive access for pedestrians, cyclists, and people who use public transport is maximised and is prioritised over motorised transports (cars, motorbikes and mopeds, for example). Improvements should be made by local authorities when existing routes are refurbished, as well as being incorporated when planning new routes. Local authorities should also work with relevant third sector organisations to make it as easy as possible for people with limited mobility to move around their local area with accessible public transport and a barrier-free pedestrian environment.

Transport planners and public health practitioners work together to ensure that travel route planning supports safe, convenient, inclusive access for pedestrians, cyclists, and people who use public transport, and that it is maximised and prioritised over motorised transport (cars, motorbikes and mopeds, for example). This may include reallocating road space to support walking and cycling, restricting motor vehicle access, introducing road-user charging and traffic-calming schemes and making it as easy as possible for people with limited mobility to move around their local area. Foot and cycle networks should pay particular attention to integrating with public transport networks.

People in the community know that local authorities and healthcare commissioners are developing and maintaining connected travel routes that prioritise pedestrians, cyclists and people who use public transport. People who walk, cycle and drive in the local area have their needs taken into account. Also, the views of people who do not walk or cycle because of the current infrastructure and people with limited mobility need to be considered. This is because there may be conflict when space is shared by people using different types of travel.

Source guidance

Physical activity and the environment (2018) NICE guideline NG90, recommendations 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6 and 1.2.7

Definition of terms used in this quality statement

Connected travel routes

The extent to which routes connect with other routes and destinations to allow an unbroken journey. It includes streets, roads, footways, footpaths, and bus and cycle routes.

[Adapted from Physical activity and the environment (NICE guideline NG90), glossary]

Equality and diversity considerations

The views and needs of people with limited mobility who may be adversely affected by connected travel routes must be addressed. People with limited mobility may find it easier to move around their local area if, for example, footways include features such as tactile paving and even surfaces. Non-reflective, anti-glare paving surfaces can make it easier for people with visual impairments to interpret their surroundings.