What happens if bedwetting returns after initial treatment?

What happens if bedwetting returns after initial treatment?

Recurrence after alarm treatment

If the bedwetting stopped when using an alarm, but has started regularly again, your healthcare team may offer further alarm treatment. If it happens again, the healthcare team should offer desmopressin (see box 2 in desmopressin treatment) to take as well as using the alarm.

Recurrence after desmopressin treatment

If the bedwetting stops while the child or young person is using desmopressin, but keeps starting again when treatment ends, the healthcare team may offer continued treatment with desmopressin (see box 3). This should be stopped every 3 months (for a week) to check if the child or young person can stay dry during the night without it. For children and young people receiving repeated desmopressin treatment, the dose should be gradually reduced at the end of a 3‑month course.

Box 3 Children and young people receiving drug treatment for bedwetting that recurs

  • For children and young people receiving drug treatment for bedwetting, in whom bedwetting recurs, the healthcare team should consider whether alarm treatment has become a suitable alternative to continuing drug treatment.

  • If the child or the young person is offered repeated courses of drug treatment for bedwetting, the healthcare team should carry out regular medication reviews to assess the child or young person's progress with the treatment.

  • Information Standard