Involving your family, carer or an advocate

Involving your family, carer or an advocate

Health and social care professionals should discuss with you whether you would like your family or carer to be involved in your care; this discussion should happen more than once in case you change your mind. If you agree, professionals should talk to you and your family or carer about what information you would like shared with them, and when.

If you do not want your family or carer involved, your healthcare professional may give them information to help them understand the mental health problem and its treatments (such as NICE 'information for the public'), but only if you agree.

You should be asked whether you would like a trained advocate to help you put your views across.

Capacity and decisions about treatment

Health and social care professionals should make sure that you are capable of making decisions about your treatment and care. However, your capacity to make such decisions may change over time. Health and social care professionals should explain any new treatment to you and should check that you have capacity to make a decision about it.

If you wish, they should help you to develop advance statements and advance decisions, especially if your mental health problem is severe or you have been treated under the Mental Health Act. Advance statements and advance decisions should be put in your care plan and you and the services responsible for your care should be given a copy of this plan.

If you can't make a decision about your treatment immediately, health and social care professionals should always check your care plan for advance statements and advance decisions before offering or starting treatment.

  • Information Standard