Quality statement 3: Involvement to improve services

Quality statement

People using mental health services are asked about their experiences and their feedback is used to improve services. [2011]

Rationale

People who have used services have a unique insight into what works well through their direct experience. People's experience of services affects whether they continue to use the services, how they use them and whether they will use them again. Capturing this feedback in the review and planning of services is essential. People can become experts through experience and should be involved in the planning, commissioning, delivery and monitoring and review of mental health services to guide improvements.

Quality measures

Structure

a) Evidence of local arrangements to collect and use the views of people who use mental health services to monitor and improve performance.

Data source: Local data collection.

b) Evidence of local arrangements to involve people who use mental health services in monitoring services; for example, using exit interviews undertaken by people who have used services.

Data source: Local data collection.

c) Evidence of local arrangements to provide the executive board with reports on acute and non-acute mental health pathways, with a breakdown of people's experience of care according to gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, background (including cultural, ethnic and religious background) and disability.

Data source: Local data collection.

Outcome

Evidence from surveys and feedback that people using mental health services feel that their views are being used to improve services.

Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (such as mental health trusts and community services) ensure that systems are in place to collect the views of people using services and use them in monitoring and improving services.

Health and social care professionals (such as psychiatrists, mental health nurses and social workers) give people using mental health services opportunities to give feedback on their experience.

Commissioners (such as clinical commissioning groups and NHS England) ensure that the mental health services they commission use the views of the people using those services to monitor and improve them.

People using mental health services are asked about their experience of care, and their feedback is used to monitor and improve the service. They are also given the chance to be directly involved in reviewing and improving services.

Source guidance

Service user experience in adult mental health services (2011) NICE guideline CG136, recommendations 1.1.20, 1.1.21 and 1.1.22