Quality statement 2: Offering outstanding vaccinations

Quality statement

Children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination are offered the outstanding vaccination.

Rationale

When a child or young person is found to have missed a vaccination, it is important that healthcare professionals discuss the importance of, and any concerns about, the outstanding vaccination with the child or young person and, if appropriate, their parents or carers. Doing this can increase immunisation coverage in the population and provide protection against disease for the child or young person.

Quality measures

Structure

Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination are offered the outstanding vaccination.

Data source: Local data collection.

Process

a) Proportion of children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination who are offered the outstanding vaccination.

Numerator – the number in the denominator who are offered the outstanding vaccination.

Denominator – the number of children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination.

Data source: Local data collection.

b) Proportion of children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination who are offered a referral to a service where they can receive an outstanding vaccination.

Numerator – the number in the denominator who are offered a referral to a service where they can receive an outstanding vaccination.

Denominator – the number of children and young people identified as having missed a childhood vaccination.

Data source: Local data collection.

Outcome

Immunisation after identification of missed immunisation appointments in under 19s.

Data source: Local data collection and COVER programme.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (for example, hospitals, GP practices and walk-in centres) ensure that systems are in place for children and young people who are identified as having missed a childhood vaccination to be offered the outstanding vaccination or referral to a service that can give the vaccination.

Healthcare professionals ensure that when they identify children and young people who have missed a childhood vaccination, they offer the vaccination or refer the child or young person to a service that can give the vaccination.

Commissioners (for example, clinical commissioning groups and NHS England) ensure that services are available to identify children and young people who have missed a childhood vaccination, and offer the vaccination or refer the child or young person to a service that can give the vaccination.

Children and young people who are found to have missed a vaccination are offered the vaccination straight away, or referred to a service that can give them the vaccination.

Source guidance

Immunisations: reducing differences in uptake in under 19s (2009) NICE guideline PH21, recommendation 1

Equality and diversity considerations

Healthcare professionals need to be aware that some children may arrive in the UK without vaccination records, and vaccination schedules in other countries may be different from the current UK programme. Healthcare professionals should ensure they get as much information as possible from the child or young person and/or parent or carer about their immunisation history and offer outstanding vaccinations. They should also identify differences in the UK programme with the country of origin of the child or young person.

Healthcare professionals should also be aware that children and young people from vulnerable groups, such as homeless, travellers, young offenders, refugees and those who are HIV positive, are at increased likelihood of having missed previous vaccinations. Healthcare professionals should ensure they get as much information as possible from the child or young person and/or parent or carer about their immunisation history and offer outstanding vaccinations.