Tools and resources

'Just one person': the named care coordinator role from the perspective of older people

'Just one person': the named care coordinator role from the perspective of older people

Introduction

This resource will help you implement the recommendations about the named care coordinator role in NICE's guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions. Drawing on the discussions from 3 focus groups facilitated by Age UK Sutton, which comprised older people living in their own homes and in a care home, it presents the views and expectations that older people have of this role. It also includes some case studies that they consider to be good examples. It is particularly relevant to managers and commissioners in local authorities and the NHS. It can be used to help develop a new named care coordinator role or review an existing one. Where appropriate, links have been made to specific recommendations from the guideline.

Key messages

  • The guideline recommends that older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions have a 'single, named care coordinator who acts as their first point of contact'.

  • Several different coordinator roles exist in health and social care, including advisors, navigators and pathway coordinators. Many of these do not deliver the type of support described in this guideline.

  • The older people consulted believe that having 1 person who is the main contact and knows about all your needs will help older people with multiple long-term conditions find their way through the health and social care system.

  • They emphasised the importance of the person sharing information and advice, and working in partnership.

  • They hope that a relationship with a named care coordinator will change the experience of older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions, who too often feel "There is no-one there" (focus group participant).


This page was last updated: 15 July 2016