Quality statement 1: Designing health and wellbeing programmes

Quality statement

People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups have their views represented in setting priorities and designing local health and wellbeing programmes.

Rationale

Health and wellbeing programmes can support positive behaviour changes and contribute to promoting health and preventing premature mortality. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups may not engage with services or may have a poor experience of those programmes and associated services if they are not culturally sensitive and appropriate. Involving people, community organisations and faith leaders who can represent the views of local minority ethnic groups helps to ensure that the services reflect the needs and preferences of the local population.

Quality measures

Structure

a) Evidence of work carried out to gather intelligence about the ethnic diversity of the local population.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, intelligence gathered for the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment.

b) Evidence of work carried out to gain understanding of the needs of black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups living in the local area.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, intelligence gathered for the joint strategic needs assessment.

c) Evidence of actions taken to gather views of local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups on priorities for and design of health and wellbeing programmes.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, from programme planning, records from meetings (agendas or minutes) and focus groups.

d) Evidence of how intelligence on ethnic diversity, the needs and views of the local population is used to inform commissioning.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, information included in local health equality assessments.

Process

a) Proportion of local health and wellbeing programmes that gathered views of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups when setting priorities and designing the programmes.

Numerator – the number in the denominator that gathered views of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups when setting priorities and designing the programmes.

Denominator – the number of health and wellbeing programmes commissioned locally.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, service annual report.

b) Proportion of people representing the views of black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups involved in setting priorities and designing local health and wellbeing programmes who felt that their views were valued.

Numerator – the number in the denominator that felt their views were valued.

Denominator – the number of people representing the views of black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups involved in setting priorities and designing local health and wellbeing programmes.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, surveys carried out with people representing ethnic groups.

Outcome

a) Uptake of local health and wellbeing services among people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, service workflow.

b) Proportion of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups referred to local health and wellbeing services who feel that the services meet their needs.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, service user survey.

c) Prevalence of obesity among local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Data source: NHS Digital's Health Survey for England and National Child Measurement Programme, and local data collection, for example, GP practice data.

d) Physical activity levels among local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Data source: Active Lives, Sport England and local data collection, for example, review of service user records held by the provider.

e) Prevalence of tobacco use among local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Data source: Office for National Statistics' Annual Population Survey and local data collection, for example, stop smoking service data.

f) Mental wellbeing among local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Data source: Local health data collection, for example mental health and wellbeing joint strategic needs assessment profile.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (primary care services, community care services and services in the wider public, community and voluntary sectors) ensure that the services they provide recognise the beliefs, expectations and values of local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups. They continually review the services to ensure that they are culturally appropriate, accessible and tailored to the diverse needs of the local population.

Health, public health and social care practitioners recognise the beliefs, expectations and values of local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups that they support. They ensure that the services they provide are culturally appropriate and accessible. This may mean working in partnership with existing local community groups or faith leaders who can support delivering some of the programmes in non-traditional community-based settings.

Commissioners (Public Health England, NHS England, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups) gather intelligence and gain understanding of the diversity of the local population and its needs. They ensure that the views of people from minority ethnic groups are represented when priorities are set and local health and wellbeing programmes are designed. This may be through engaging local communities using public consultation or community workshops that discuss future services. These can ensure that the local population is represented by individuals as well as established community groups and educational or religious leaders. The commissioners also ensure that local services have the skills mix and capacity to provide support that is culturally appropriate and tailored to the needs of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups to make positive behaviour changes.

People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups advise on what local health and wellbeing programmes should focus on and what culturally sensitive and acceptable services should look like. They share their views during workshops or consultations organised by the commissioners, or through other people who they trust, such as community leaders or faith leaders.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Health and wellbeing programmes

Health and wellbeing programmes cover all strategies, initiatives, services, activities, projects or research that aim to improve health (physical and mental) and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities.

[Adapted from NICE's guideline on community engagement]

Equality and diversity considerations

Due to language and communication difficulties or past experiences of racism and prejudice, some people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups may not have had a positive experience of accessing services. This may prevent them from engaging with services and increase their risk of poor health outcomes. Commissioners and providers seeking to obtain the views and understand the needs of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups should work closely with existing community groups, faith leaders and educators who may already have links to groups and individuals with poor access to services.