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Public health intervention and programme guidance

Public Health Intervention Guidance Process

1. Topic selected
The intervention topic is referred to NICE by the Department of Health based on recommendations from the public health topic selection consideration panel.

2. Post referral clarification meeting
Sometimes a post referral clarification meeting will be held to seek clarification from key groups on the focus and direction of the guidance.

3. Stakeholders register interest
Potential stakeholders are asked to register an interest. Stakeholders may include national organisations representing professionals, research and academic institutions, industry and special interest groups from the general public. Stakeholders are consulted throughout the guidance development process.

4. Scope prepared
The scope sets out what the guidance will - and will not - cover, and outlines the review process. After a 4 week consultation period the scope is finalised.

5. Evidence reviewed
A synopsis is prepared, with an evidence review and economic appraisal of the intervention. The evidence review may be done by NICE or by a contracted research body.

6. Call for Evidence
Registered stakeholders may be asked to submit additional evidence at any time during the development stage.

7. Draft intervention guidance prepared
The Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee (PHIAC) reviews the evidence and produces draft intervention guidance. Read more about PHIAC.

8. Consultation on the draft guidance
The draft guidance (containing all of the recommendations and details of how they were developed) is issued for an 8 week consultation with stakeholders. At the same time, stakeholders can comment on the evidence reviews that the draft guidance is based on.

9. Fieldwork carried out
The draft guidance is also field tested at the same time that it is out for consultation. A series of fieldwork meetings are held with professionals, practitioners and commissioners (as appropriate) not previously involved in developing the guidance. The meeting reports are combined into a fieldwork report, which is submitted to PHIAC.

10. Final guidance produced
PHIAC reviews the fieldwork report and comments from the stakeholder consultation and makes appropriate changes to the guidance.

11. Guidance issued
NICE formally approves the final guidance before it is published.

Public Health Programme Guidance Process.

1. Topic selected
The intervention topic is referred to NICE by the Department of Health based on recommendations from the public health topic selection consideration panel.

2. Post referral clarification meeting
Sometimes a post referral clarification meeting will be held to seek clarification from key groups on the focus and direction of the guidance.

3. Stakeholders register interest
Potential stakeholders are asked to register an interest. Stakeholders may include national organisations representing professionals, research and academic institutions, industry and special interest groups from the general public. Stakeholders are consulted throughout the guidance development process.

4. Programme development group established
A programme development group (PDG), made up of members selected for their expertise in the field is established. Read more about programme development groups.

5. Scope prepared
The scope sets out what the guidance will - and will not - cover, and outlines the review process. After a 4 week consultation period the scope is finalised.

6. Evidence reviewed
Typically, four or five evidence reviews and one economic modelling report are undertaken. The evidence reviews may be done by NICE or by a contracted research body.

7. Call for Evidence
Registered stakeholders may be asked to submit additional evidence at any time during the development stage.

8. Draft programme guidance prepared
The PDG reviews the evidence over a number of meetings and develops draft programme guidance.

9. Consultation on the draft guidance
The draft guidance (containing all of the recommendations and details of how they were developed) is issued for an 8 week consultation with stakeholders. At the same time, stakeholders can comment on the evidence reviews that the draft guidance is based on.

10. Fieldwork carried out
The draft guidance is also field tested at the same time that it is out for consultation. A series of fieldwork meetings are held with professionals, practitioners and commissioners (as appropriate) not previously involved in developing the guidance. The meeting reports are combined into a fieldwork report, which is submitted to the PDG.

11. Final guidance produced
The PDG reviews the fieldwork report and comments from the stakeholder consultation and makes appropriate changes to the guidance.

12. Guidance issued
NICE formally approves the final guidance before it is published.

This page was last updated: 02 October 2012

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.