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Reviewing published clinical guidelines

This is a brief summary of how NICE carries out surveillance of published clinical guidelines to establish whether an update is needed. See all published clinical guidelines.

This is an interim process and methodology, which is described in more detail here.

Published guidelines undergo surveillance reviews every 2 years after publication to decide if an update is needed at that time. This surveillance review decision is informed by a number of stages of intelligence gathering, including searches for evidence, related guidance and qualitative feedback from other NICE departments, the National Collaborating Centre (NCC) that developed the original guideline and the Guideline Development Group (GDG).

1. Stakeholders register interest
National organisations representing patients and carers, and also healthcare professionals involved in their care, can register as stakeholders.

Read more about stakeholder registration.

2. Surveillance process begins
Searches take place for new evidence that may have emerged after publication of the guideline that will inform surveillance review proposals for updating.

3. Surveillance review proposal prepared
The surveillance review proposal will outline a summary of the key factors that have influenced the decision behind the proposal.

4. Consultation on the surveillance review proposal (only for proposals to not update the guideline at 4 and 8 years after publication)
This is a period for registered stakeholders to comment on any surveillance review proposal to not update the guideline in whole or in part.

Surveillance review proposals about guidelines undergoing surveillance at 2, 6 and 10 years after publication will not be consulted on.

5. Final surveillance review decision produced
NICE Guidance Executive makes a final decision on whether NICE will update the guideline.

6. Surveillance review decision issued
NICE publishes the review decision on its website.

This page was last updated: 16 September 2013

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.