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Laurie Tomlinson

Laurie TomlinsonClinical Lecturer, Translational Medicine
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Laurie Tomlinson is a clinical lecturer and specialist registrar in nephrology working at Addenbrooke's Hospital. Her academic work relates to the overlap between chronic kidney disease, blood pressure and cardiovascular disease on a clinical research and translational level. She has previously completed a PhD, published papers and leads several ongoing research studies in this area. In addition, she has a keen interest in how research evidence is translated into health policy.

This has led to development of the project that she will undertake as a NICE Scholar, investigating the relationship between rates of prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and hospital admissions with acute kidney injury, at both a local and national level. Although the evidence from clinical trials supports widespread use of ACE Inhibitors to slow progression of renal disease, recent research suggests that the benefits on a population level may be unclear. This project aims to investigate how routinely collected data can be used to provide feedback on the outcomes of guideline implementation, an idea that may have implications well beyond nephrology. The project is kindly supported by the Renal Association and supervised by Martin Roland, Professor of Health Services Research and Ian Wilkinson, Reader in Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Cambridge.

Where are they now?

I am still a Clinical Lecturer in Translational Medicine at Addenbrooke's Hospital but have been so inspired by my NICE scholarship that I have also been working on related epidemiological projects at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The results of the project I have worked on through the scholarship are extremely interesting and I am currently writing these up for publication and will be presenting them at the Renal Association in June 2012. The results will form the basis of funding applications later this year to develop my work looking at how the results of clinical trials relate to real-life patients and what this means for the risk: benefit ratio of drugs on a population level, particularly with regard to kidney disease.

This page was last updated: 30 April 2012

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Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.