Final Scope for patient education models for diabetes

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLINICAL EXCELLENCE

Health Technology Appraisal

Patient education models for diabetes

Scope

Objective: to establish the clinical and cost effectiveness of available models for educating people with diabetes in diabetes self-management, and to provide guidance to the NHS in England and Wales.1

Background: diabetes is estimated to affect around 2-3% of the population and is a major source of morbidity. There are over 1 million people with diagnosed diabetes in England and Wales, of which about 15% have Type 1 diabetes.

The technologies: the aim of education for people with diabetes is to improve their knowledge and skills, enabling them to take control of their own condition and to integrate self-management into their daily lives. The ultimate goal of education is to improve blood glucose control, with the associated benefits of reducing diabetes-associated complications and enhancing quality of life. The recently published National Service Framework proposes a 'supported self care service model' for diabetes, and recognises the importance of education in facilitating self-management as the cornerstone of diabetes care.

Intervention(s)

Models for educating people in diabetes self-management, both in groups and individually.

Self-management in this context refers to achieving and maintaining blood glucose control through, for example, diet, exercise, oral medications and/or insulins.

Population(s) Adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.
Current standard treatments (comparators) Usual care in clinics or general practice, including informal education and unevaluated, locally developed education packages.
Other considerations:

Outcomes considered should include clinical outcomes, such as metabolic control, severe hypoglycaemia and diabetes-related complications, hospital admissions, and quality of life, including psychosocial and psychological well-being.

In the absence of long-term studies, it may not be possible to measure the impact of education on diabetes-related complications which can occur many years after diagnosis. If necessary, clinical outcomes such as metabolic control will be considered as surrogate indicators for long-term complications.

Where possible, individuals' preferred learning styles, and the needs of and outcomes for different groups, including for example the elderly and people from different ethnic groups, will be taken into account.

A clinical guideline for Type 2 diabetes blood glucose management has been developed by the Institute and is due for publication in Summer 2002. A clinical guideline for the management of Type 1 diabetes is currently being developed by the Institute.

1 The Department of Health remit to the Institute is "To advise on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of available models for educating patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and helping them to manage their own condition.

This page was last updated: 30 March 2010

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Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.