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Awareness training for health and social care staff

Quality statement

Health and social care staff receive alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care of people who misuse alcohol.

Quality measure

Structure

a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care is delivered to all health and social care staff who potentially work with patients or service users who misuse alcohol.

b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that local patient and service user feedback, in the form of surveys and complaints, is collected, analysed and acted upon within all health and social care settings.

Process

Proportion of health and social care staff potentially working with patients or service users who misuse alcohol, who have successfully completed alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care of people who misuse alcohol.

Numerator - the number of people in the denominator completing alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care of people who misuse alcohol.

Denominator - the number of health and social care staff potentially working with patients or service users who misuse alcohol.

Description of what the quality statement means for each audience

Service providers ensure they deliver alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care, to all staff potentially working with patients or service users who misuse alcohol, and collect and act upon patient and service user feedback, in the form of surveys and complaints.

Health and social care professionals potentially working with patients or service users who misuse alcohol complete alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non‑judgmental care of people who misuse alcohol, embed this training into their routine practice, and use local patient and service user feedback policies and surveys.

Commissioners ensure they commission services that provide alcohol awareness training that promotes respectful, non-judgmental care, for all staff potentially working with patients or service users who misuse alcohol, and which collect and act upon patient and service user feedback, in the form of surveys and complaints.

People who misuse alcohol are cared for by health and social care staff who have received training in alcohol awareness that includes respectful and non-judgmental care, and have the opportunity to feedback their experience of staff attitudes using a survey or complaints procedure.

Source clinical guideline references

NICE clinical guideline 115 recommendations 1.1.1.1, 1.1.1.2 and 1.2.1.2 (key priority for implementation) and NICE public health guidance 24 recommendation 5.

Data source

Structure

a) and b) Local data collection.

Process

Local data collection.

Definitions

For the purposes of this statement, health and social care staff are defined as any worker potentially having contact with people who misuse alcohol in any health or social care setting, including those working in criminal justice, prison, community or voluntary sector settings.

There should be a stepped approach to alcohol awareness training provision, depending on staff roles and the nature of contact with people who misuse alcohol. As a minimum, all workers who potentially have contact with people who misuse alcohol should complete basic training that promotes a respectful and non-judgmental attitude to people who misuse alcohol and which takes into account the stigma and discrimination often associated with alcohol misuse.

NICE public health guidance 24 recommends that health and social care professionals providing care for people at risk of hazardous and harmful drinking in NHS-commissioned services should receive training in providing alcohol screening and structured brief advice and if there is local demand, should also be trained to deliver extended brief interventions.

Staff training should also cover provision of information to people misusing alcohol, appropriate to the worker's role.

Equality and diversity considerations

NICE clinical guideline 115 reports of stigma in healthcare settings towards people who misuse alcohol in general. In addition, women can be more likely to experience stigma in relation to their drinking than men and people from minority ethnic groups might find it more difficult to openly discuss their emotional problems due to cultural factors, such as cultural honour and respect. People who are homeless can be particularly vulnerable to discrimination. This quality statement advances equality by ensuring equitable staff conduct towards all patients, service users and clients, including those who (potentially) misuse alcohol.

This page was last updated: 25 August 2011

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Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.